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Can I freeze lemon curd?

  • k

I took advantage of my overloaded lemon tree over the weekend and made up a double batch of lemon curd. Half of it will go to a bridal shower this weekend, but I can't possibly get through the other half. I have neither the time nor the inclination to learn how to can right now, so I stuck it in the freezer. Will it be o.k. when I thaw it?

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  1. j
    Janet A. Zimmerman

    Yes, It freezes beautifully. When thawed, it will last a week or 10 days in the fridge.

    1. j
      JessicaSophia

      one suggestion: cover the surface of the lemon curd itself with plastic wrap before refrigerating or freezing. That prevents a skin from forming.

      2 Replies
      1. re: JessicaSophia

        I have made lemon curd several times and kept it in an airtight plastic container, and it has never formed a skin. You wind up wasting the curd that sticks to the wrap, and who wants to do that?

        1. re: Bluestocking

          I end up licking the plastic wrap. It's one of the little "dividends" for the cook.

      2. Ahhh, lemon curd! I know there are many recipes out there, but which one do you use, if you don't mind sharing? How long did it take you to make?

        (I love curd. ANY curd. Lemon, lime, raspberry. But passionfruit is my absolute favorite - hard to get, though.)

        11 Replies
        1. re: Katerina

          I found the recipe on Epicurious. It was very simple and delicious. I kept ducking my head into the refrigerator as it was cooling for another taste. The recipe goes something like this:

          NB: I strongly recommend using a microplane grater for the zesting. It is well worth the small investment as it made amazingly quick work of 12 lemons.

          2 T lemon zest
          1 cup fresh lemon juice
          1 1/3 cups sugar
          4 eggs
          1 3/4 sticks butter

          Whisk everything but the butter together in a heavy saucepan, add the butter, and cook over medium-low heat until the curd holds the marks of the whisk and begins to bubble. Strain immediately.

          1. re: kjhart

            Oh, so that's what I made this weekend! I had a tart shell in the freezer along with with mixed berries and needed something that would make the two work together. I found a similar recipe in Maury Rubin's (of City Bakery fame) tart cookbook; same ingredients, slightly different amount.

            I don't see why you couldn't freeze the curd considering the ingredients. But probably after 3 months it might be reduced in quality.

            By the way, the tart was delicious and SOOOOO easy. I used Jamie Oliver's short pastry recipe and had some frozen so it was really easy to just pop that in the oven, pour the lemon curd in, cool and then pour on a bunch of mixed berries.

            1. re: kjhart

              Mmmmmm... thanks! Looks ultra easy. Will try soon!

              Here's a source for passionfruit curd, which is more expensive to make (where do you get cheap p-fs? They are $2 a pop where I shop).

              Link: http://www.dcimports.com/thurcotpascu...

            2. re: Katerina

              Isn't passion fruit curd wonderful! I've made it a number of times for use as an ingredient in passion fruit buttercream.

              1. re: Timowitz

                My *favorite* substance on earth. If I were on death row, this would be my final meal: a dessert bowl of passionfruit curd with a few raspberries on top. I figured this out long ago...

                But I have a question for you: Do you make it with fresh passionfruit? Isn't it kind of pricey? I found a recipe in Nigella Lawson's "Domestic Goddess" that calls for 11 passionfruit to make one batch - that's $22 where I shop, not cheap. Do you have a cheaper source, can you buy the juice frozen? Where?? (maybe I don't want to wait for death row...)

                1. re: Katerina
                  c
                  Caitlin McGrath

                  In Manhattan, Buon Italia in the Chelsea Market sells a French brand of frozen fruit purees, which come in plastic bottles of about a liter, I think. I noticed passion fruit once. They run around $10-12, but that's a lot of puree, compared to fresh. I can't speak to the quality or taste, however.

                  1. re: Katerina

                    Cheffie friends swear by this companies passion fruit puree. He uses it for curd and passion fruit poundcake.

                    1. re: Thea

                      Sorry, attached is the website.

                      Link: http://www.perfectpuree.com/

                    2. re: Katerina

                      I don't know where you live, but funny enough I was in a Western Beef Mega Supermarket in Ridgewood QUeens last night and purusing the aisles to see what sort of exotic ingredients they might have for future reference. In the frozen section I came across frozen tamarind, passionfruit, guava, and a few other that I cann't remember that were packaged like a log of frozen ready to reconstitute Orange Juice and priced accordingly - around $1.60 per log. Western Beef "markets" to a latino crowd, with a lot of island flavors mixed in. This was not a Goya brand either. Sometimes I've seen frozen plastic bags of mango, guannabana and such there too. This particular branch is like a mega store, so they had more available. By the way, they also had fresh tamarand in the produce section.

                      Long winded way of saying, check out ethnic markets that cater to tropical customers for frozen purees - passionfruit is available out there.

                      1. re: Katerina

                        I make the passion fruit curd from Rose Levy Beranbaum's The Cake Bible. I use fresh passion fruit, but I pay 99 cents each for them at a local Wal-Mart type of store, Meijer. I live in a diddly-doo burg in Michigan.

                        I have been looking for passion fruit puree or juice but haven't been able to find it undiluted. It's either mucked up with sugar and chemicals ("nectar") or with apple and pear juice. The search has been mounted because passion fruit is apparently out of season at the moment and I want to try Pierre Herme's chocolate passion.

                    3. re: Katerina

                      I use Rose Levy Beranbaum's, from *The Cake Bible*.
                      It's perhaps more tart than most.

                    4. It also makes wonderful ice cream!