HOME > Chowhound > General Topics >
Are you making a specialty food? Tell us about it
TELL US

Fresh garbanzo beans

p
pat hammond Feb 15, 2003 03:17 PM

In my Mexican grocery store I saw large baskets of what turned out to be fresh, green, garbanzo beans. The're in a green pod, like peas, just one bean to a pod. (At first I thought they were fresh olives.) Folks were buying big produce bags full. When I asked the cashier how they were prepared she said Mexican people ate them raw.

I wonder if anyone has cooked with these beans. It seems you could cook them like fava or lima beans but I'm not sure.

  1. i
    ironmom Feb 15, 2003 03:18 PM

    Maybe like edamame.

    3 Replies
    1. re: ironmom
      s
      suzannapilaf Feb 15, 2003 03:48 PM

      Exactamente! My daughter and I bought them from street carts when we were in Guanajuato and San Miguel de Allende. I think they were steamed and then sprinkled with lime and chili. Delicious! I wish I knew where to get some.

      1. re: suzannapilaf
        p
        Pat Hammond Feb 15, 2003 05:22 PM

        Suzanna, do you recall if the ones you saw were shelled?

        Thanks.

        1. re: Pat Hammond
          s
          suzannapilaf Feb 16, 2003 01:41 PM

          They were in the pods and you ate them like edamame, sucking the bean out and throwing away the pod. Definitely a messy, napkin-needing process but the flavor was all on the outside of the pod - lime, chili, salt. Similar to what you find sprinkled on roasted sweet corn when that is in season. I've traveled quite a bit in Mexico and the state of Guanajuato is the only place I've seen these. Don't know if that was a seasonal thing or a regional thing but I'm going to my local Latino market today to see if they have some. Also to indulge in Sunday menudo!

    2. s
      Stanley Stephan Feb 15, 2003 04:44 PM

      Seriously, you eat them raw. A farmer was selling them last spring at the farmer's market.

      They taste like English Peas. I was told you could eat them raw or steam them. There is a loose fuzzy pod that you remove before eating.

      Was sort of ticked at the farmer. When I asked what they were, he said to try one. I was about to pop the whole thing, shell and all, in my mouth and I thought I'd ask if I shoud eat the whole thing. It was only THEN he said to take it out of the shell. Farm humor, I suppose. Give the boys back home to laugh about someone eating the bean AND shell.

      1. c
        Cristina Feb 15, 2003 11:14 PM

        It's the season for fresh garbanzo beans here in the state of Jalisco, Mexico. Their name in Spanish is guasana (gwah-SAH-nah). Trucks trundle up and down our village streets hawking them...4 pesos (about 40 cents) a kilo. They're weighed and sold still on the branches, in big bundles.

        Here's how they're cooked and served:

        Take the little green pods off the branches. Feed the branches to your cow, or your burro.

        In a large skillet, bring a two or three tablespoons of salted water to a boil. Add the guasanas, still in their pods, and steam, stirring frequently, until tender. The pods should be bright green when done.

        Pop the pods open with your fingers and eat the tender little green garbanzos. Yummmmmmm...

        Here where I am, these are most often steamed outside on a brazier and sold by the bagful to passersby.

        6 Replies
        1. re: Cristina
          p
          Pat Hammond Feb 16, 2003 10:32 AM

          Thank you, Cristina! I can manage everything except the atmosphere, with cow and burro!

          1. re: Pat Hammond
            c
            Cristina Feb 16, 2003 01:08 PM

            C'mon down. :)

          2. re: Cristina
            f
            FERNANDO JURADO Sep 27, 2003 12:58 AM

            CRISTINA
            COULD YOU TELL ME, WHERE GUASANA IS GROWN AND PACKED IN JALISCO
            BEST REGARDS,
            FERNANDO

            1. re: Cristina
              c
              crafteeidea Aug 22, 2009 03:29 PM

              I bought a pound of fresh garbanzo beans at the grocery store yesterday. If I follow these instructions and steam them while they are still in their pods until the beans are tender, can I then shell the cooked beans and make hummus out of them? Has anyone ever made hummus with fresh garbanzo beans? How did it turn out? Does anyone have any suggestions?

              1. re: crafteeidea
                KimberlyPye Mar 31, 2010 06:06 PM

                You CAN make hummus with fresh garbanzos! I'm going to be trying this recipe tomorrow! http://www.urbanhonking.com/hotknives...

              2. re: Cristina
                tatertotsrock Jul 29, 2010 09:56 AM

                Thanks so much for this! I just bought a huge bag at an El Super Grocery store in Orance county. I had never seen them before and all the lables in the market are in Spanish...asked a gent what they were,,,,he told me garbanzos and pointed to some dried one in another bulk bin.
                I couldnt wait to get them home to figure out what to do with them : )

              3. j
                jake pine Feb 16, 2003 10:54 AM

                Which Mexican grocery store are you referring to?
                jake

                1 Reply
                1. re: jake pine
                  p
                  Pat Hammond Feb 16, 2003 06:08 PM

                  I'll reply about the markets on the Tristate board, Jake. Meet you there...

                2. f
                  FERNANDO JURADO Sep 27, 2003 12:35 AM

                  HELLO
                  I'D LIKE TO KNOW IF THESE FRESH GARBANZOS ARE THE SAME CHICK PEAS OR... IS A DIFFERENT VARIETY??
                  THANKS,
                  FERNANDO

                  4 Replies
                  1. re: FERNANDO JURADO
                    w
                    wally Sep 27, 2003 12:53 AM

                    Garbanzos are chick peas, also cecci
                    beans.

                    1. re: FERNANDO JURADO
                      b
                      butterfly Sep 27, 2003 01:11 AM

                      I think the English translation for what you are describing is "pigeon peas". They look just like garbanzos, but are green and can be eaten raw or roasted. You can also get them canned at most Latin American grocery stores--they are called "gandules" (Puerto rican? Dominican?).

                      1. re: FERNANDO JURADO
                        p
                        Pat Hammond Sep 27, 2003 10:48 AM

                        As Wally, said it's the same bean, with two different names.

                        1. re: Pat Hammond
                          f
                          FERNANDO JURADO Sep 27, 2003 09:50 PM

                          PATT

                          I HAVE A INQUIRE FOT THIS PRODUCT FOR US MARKETS, BUT I'M NOT SURE ABOUT THE VARIETY OR IF IS JUST THE SAME PRODUCT WITH DIFFERENT NAMES.
                          AT LEAST I KNOW THAT THIS KIND OF GARBANZO PRODUCES ONE SEED PER POD... MAYBE IS THE SAME VARIETY?

                          BEST REGARDS,
                          FERNANDO

                      2. s
                        snackish Jan 11, 2004 07:35 PM

                        Ah, you brought back memories of walking through the fields, picking them and eating them fresh...

                        Link: http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/cr...

                        1 Reply
                        1. re: snackish
                          p
                          Pat Hammond Jan 11, 2004 08:14 PM

                          Wow! Thanks for the reminder that I'll be seeing them again, in a little over a month! Pat

                        2. Will Owen Apr 1, 2010 04:48 PM

                          Good friend just emailed me today to say he'd gotten some of those, and found a recipe from Thomas Keller for deep-frying them, and that they were really good that way. Doesn't surprise me at all, and not just because I trust both my friend and Chef Keller; garbanzos is what falafel is made out of, and so of COURSE they're good deep-fried!

                          Well, okay, maybe ANYTHING remotely edible would be good deep-fried...

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: Will Owen
                            Funwithfood Jun 4, 2011 05:54 PM

                            Just picked a bunch up and couldn't remember the chef that recommendend frying them, thanks for the reminder. Just got his cookbook so all's good!

                          Show Hidden Posts