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Goose stock--soup ideas, anyone??

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lucia Dec 27, 2002 03:35 PM

I have about 2 gallons of goose stock ready to go, as a result of Christmas goose dinner and my not being psychologically able to put a good carcass in the garbage. The stock is not as gamey as duck stock can be, not as "chewy" as turkey stock, more interesting than chicken stock. Seems like it would make a nice soup.

I imagine Danish and Finnish families would have used goose for soup? What do y'all think would work? I was thinking maybe a mushroom-barley-vegetable.

All ideas welcome! Thanks.

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  1. z
    Zorra RE: lucia Dec 27, 2002 04:12 PM

    I think that in parts of Texas during hunting season people sometimes make goose gumbo. I vaguely remember a recipe in Texas Monthly many years ago...probably you could adapt any gumbo recipe that calls for chicken.

    2 Replies
    1. re: Zorra
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      lucia RE: Zorra Dec 27, 2002 04:21 PM

      And I happen to have okra too;)

      1. re: lucia
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        Stanley Stephan RE: lucia Dec 27, 2002 05:05 PM

        There's a link below for goose gumbo.

        Here's a link for goose risotto:

        http://www.goose.cc/Pages/geesegainin...

        Also, scroll down this link for a really delicious sounding Cream of Carrot and Lemon Soup that uses goose stock.

        http://www.ack.net/christmas/recipes....

        NONSANGUINEOUS SVARTSOPPA ... or goose revenge soup

        http://www.soupsong.com/znov02.html

        GOLDEN GOOSE SOUP WITH PEARL BARLEY

        http://www.goose.cc/Pages/morerecipes...

        Link: http://home.tiac.net/~kaleberg/cass/g...

    2. r
      Ron Rosenbaum RE: lucia Dec 27, 2002 04:15 PM

      Lucia,

      Garbure, is a traditional French country cabbage soup, usually made with duck or goose. There's a recipe in the new Zuni Cafe cookbook, and one in Julia Child's "mastering the art" vol. 1, but you could also surf around and find one. Proscuitto or pork products are also often used. A chef I worked for would save the ends and scraps from meat based terrines, and dice it up for his Garbure.

      Use the congealed goose fat on top of your stock for sauteing your veggies. Can't let you throw good goose fat away.

      1 Reply
      1. re: Ron Rosenbaum
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        lucia RE: Ron Rosenbaum Dec 27, 2002 04:21 PM

        No way would I throw the fat away--I've got a quart of it, pure snowy white, in the fridge right now.

        Thanks!

      2. p
        Pat Goldberg RE: lucia Dec 28, 2002 08:01 AM

        I guess I wasn't very imaginative with the stock from our Thanksgiving goose, but I used some of it to make matzoh ball soup (fabulous on December 5 during the snow storm!), some of it as the stock in a vegetable pilaf (designed to make granschildren more vegetable friendly), and have frozen the rest for future use.

        Pat G.

        1 Reply
        1. re: Pat Goldberg
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          lucia RE: Pat Goldberg Dec 29, 2002 01:58 PM

          Hi Pat,

          For soup I decided to make a garbure-type soup that included some barley and no meat.

          Did you have leftover goose meat, and if so, what did you do with it? I have to decide fast, as time is wasting. Thinking of rillettes or maybe try that gumbo mentioned here.

          I made a pate with the liver, cognac, shallots, etc., based on a Jacques Pepin recipe, but the meat didn't seem to fit.

          Thanks!

          lucia

        2. c
          Catherine RE: lucia Dec 30, 2002 12:26 PM

          A roasted garlic soup is improved ten times over with goose stock instead of chicken stock.

          Yummy....

          1. d
            Dan Raffle RE: lucia Dec 30, 2002 03:19 PM

            I made an excellent winter minestrone using goose stock, hard squash (kabota), white beans, carrot, celery, onion, leek, etc. It came out great. I thought the goose stock added great body and richness.

            With the leftover soup, I made fried ribollita - add chunks of stale bread to the soup until it is a mush, with an egg to bind it. Fry the mixture in olive oil till dark brown and crispy. Yum.

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