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Restaurant rage

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  • Bob W. Sep 5, 2001 11:13 AM
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Interesting article in today's Washington Post on "restaurant rage." Surprise, it's a phenomenon among the same type of people who suffer from airplane rage and road rage.

Link: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/...

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  1. Very interesting article. I really like when other Chowhounds share stuff like this. Thanks.

    2 Replies
    1. re: Ruby

      You're quite welcome.

      The Post food section is quite good. This week's also has a report on finding a good lobster roll in the DC area. Short answer: it's tough, and you'll pay dearly.

      1. re: Ruby
        s
        Scotch Bonnet

        I second Ruby's sentiments, both on the article and the sharing.

      2. I third the thanks for sharing. That was a scary article.

        1. m
          Mike Kilgore

          Pretty soon were going to have specific catagories for every situation in which people get angry.

          Toilet Paper Rage: For those who demand the start of the roll be hung facing them, against those who want it hung facing away, and whose faces are flush with anger.

          Starbucks Rage: For those who are mad as hell and can't take the Corpifaction of America any longer.

          Cell Phone in the Movies Rage: For those who beat upon, (or at least pelt with popcorn), the idiots who take calls in the middle of the movie.

          Taking An Eternity To Leave A Parking Place Rage: For those who actually get out of their waiting vehicles, and throw the kids into the car and buckle them into their car seats, toss the packages into the trunk and force the parked person to start the car and get the hell out of the space before the waitees become qualified members of AARP.

          I'm sure there must be more? Anyone?

          10 Replies
          1. re: Mike Kilgore

            I believe 'waiting-in-line' rage is a biggy. The arguments that used to erupt on the checkout line at Fairway Market are legendary. Sensible-looking people would suddenly get into high-pitched screaming matches: "I was ahead of you in line! Get out of my way."

            Last week, I was in the public library waiting to check out a book. A woman says into the air "Where's the check-out?" I reply "Right here where I am." No response, no thank you. I then go to check-out my book and she says to me in a hysterical loud voice, "I believe I was ahead of you!" Somewhat amused, I say "Really? Okay go ahead." She turns her head to me while checking out and glares at me with eyes of madness. I suddenly lose it and say "Why are you giving me a dirty look when you didn't even know where the line was? I told you to go ahead of me!" She sizes me up and down and sees that I'm taller than her and just maybe I'm as nutty as she is. She marches out and another unpleasant confrontation has occured that was not necessary. Line rage is up there with road rage.

            1. re: Ruby

              I have a "line rage" story with a nice ending. Last year I was waiting on line at Macys in San Francisco, waiting to pay for a handbag. I turned away slightly, to look at another bag on display. When I turned around, another customer had darted in front of me. The saleslady politely informed her that I had been waiting. Line rage customer sputtered protestations, to which I sweetly replied, "I'm not in a rush, please go ahead of me." This totally unnerved her and she continued to argue that she was in the right. I just smiled back. When the saleslady did wait on me, she gave me a 10% discount on the spot, just for being so nice!!! I felt compelled to tell her that I was visiting from NY, and just trying to beat the rap of "unfriendly New Yorker."

            2. re: Mike Kilgore

              I nominate:

              "Drive it or Park it" rage!
              For those ultra cautious drivers (who often can barely see over the dashboard) who dare not go the minimum speed limit on any major thoroughfare forcing huge line ups of traffice behind them, and take about 20 minutes to make that death-defying turn into the parking lot, where the "Wait for Eternity to Park" rage naturally follows.

              And there's the always popular

              "If I Hit you in the Butt with my Shopping Cart in the Grocery Check-out Line It Will Make the Line Go Faster" rage:

              The culprit always seems to be a "seasoned citizen" who, it appears, feels free to nudge and nudge and/or push the cart onto your heels, so you'll move up a micrometer, thus speeding the line. (I swear, some day I'm gonna shove back---hard!)

              1. re: Mike Kilgore

                I nominate:

                "Drive it or Park it" rage!
                For those ultra cautious drivers (who often can barely see over the dashboard) who dare not go the minimum speed limit on any major thoroughfare forcing huge line ups of traffice behind them, and take about 20 minutes to make that death-defying turn into the parking lot, where the "Wait for Eternity to Park" rage naturally follows.

                And there's the always popular

                "If I Hit you in the Butt with my Shopping Cart in the Grocery Check-out Line It Will Make the Line Go Faster" rage:

                The culprit always seems to be a "seasoned citizen" who, it appears, feels free to nudge and nudge and/or push the cart onto your heels, so you'll move up a micrometer, thus speeding the line. (I swear, some day I'm gonna shove back---hard!)

                1. re: berkleybabe

                  This can be scary. I observed a near-miss today of a car of four white haired persons from Florida, who seemed unable to decide whether they wanted to be in the left turn only lane or the left turn ahead lane, and distracted by this, proceeded into the intersection as though the light was green. There was much honking of horns and evasive maneuvers.

                  1. re: berkleybabe

                    I think I want to invent my own rage. The next time someone approaches an elevator at which I've been waiting and the button (whether up or down) of which I've already pushed (as its illuminated state attests), and then pushes that button, gets it.

                  2. re: Mike Kilgore

                    What about phone menu rage? I experience an impotent sense of rage when I'm required to punch in multiple numbers to find how to speak to a (mostly) live person. At one time, if you knew there would be a list of options, you could immediaely hit zero and get an operator. Not any more! Now they they've anticipated that and give you some other # to punch! And when you finally get where you fervently hope you want to be, you are told that all operators are busy and that your call IS VERY IMPORTANT TO THEM!

                    I am not a hot tempred person (in fact, someone once described my temperament as bovine!) but I have damaged two phones after slamming them down in utter purple- faced frustration. pat

                    1. re: pat hammond

                      Pat, this is so HUGE a rage, I think we've almost over looked in its (yes) ubiquitous. Hey, trying to change health insurance...talk about a visit to purgatory. And you're right, any business/service that has this voice mail hell and has the gall to say" your call is important."....well, 7th - 9th circle of hell isn't good enough.

                      1. re: pat hammond

                        In that instance, most of my rage stems from having no one to rage AT!

                        1. re: pat hammond

                          How about one of the big name restaurants in Manhattan that makes making a dinner reservation number five or six on their list of options? (Number one was to plan a private party.)