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Tim Sing (Saw My)

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  • Dennis Oct 18, 2000 09:03 PM
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My previous post on Hot & Sour Soup described a wonderful Chinese restaurant which was the first to introduce our area to the Mandarin-Szechuan style of Chinese cuisine, breaking the dominance of the Cantonese style which had long been typical of our area.

In addition to its outstanding Hot & Sour Soup, another one of its wonderful delicacies was an appetizer listed on the menu as "Tim Sing" or "Saw My" in parentheses.

This appetizer consisted of a total of 6 tender dumplings which were "open" at the top. Inside was a mixture of tender minced pork, scallions, and I don't know what else, but it sure was good! These dumplings would literally melt in your mouth and explode with flavor. A great accompaniment to this appetizer was fresh hot chile oil and pieces of fresh raw cabbage.

Ever since this restaurant closed, due to health problems among its family run staff members, I have had similar steamed dumplings at a number of other Chinese restaurans. However, none of them have ever been able to match the delectable taste of those which I enjoyed at this particular restaurant. At this time, there is a popular Thai restaurant in my area which serves a similar order of 6 "open" faced dumplings, but they tend to be rubbery and hard. They don't have that exquisite "melt in your mouth" texture and consistency that the "Tim Sing" at this particular restaurant did.

I am wondering if any of you have ever had a love affair with this particular Chinese appetizer, known as Tim Sing, Saw My, or whatever. It's been over ten years since I had a decent rendition.

Are any of you familiar with this delicacy? Do you know of any restaurant which serves this with a consistently high standard of quality? This inquiring Sinopalate wants to know.

Dennis

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  1. It's all in the recipe. Most have no flavor, skimpy filling, etc. Most customers are happy with the cheap ones made with starchy fillers, so why make something expensive that nobody seems to want?
    If you try (shrimp) shu mai in most Japanese restaurants, they're all so much alike, I think they must get them from the same supplier. I told my favorite sushi chef/Japanese restaurant owner I made my own, and he was astounded. They were the only "shrimp" shu mai I've ever had that actually tasted like shrimp.