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frozen salmon filets, how to prepare?

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I'm embarassed to post this question, but here goes.

At my aunt's house I recently ate a meal prepared with frozen salmon filet. It was quite good. I was surprised (gee, I didn't know frozen salmon filet could taste this good!). So, I go out and buy a couple of frozen salmon filets.

Ummm, now how do I prepare these things? Do I need to defrost them ahead of time? If so, how? Do I just move them from freezer to fridge the night before the evening I'm going to cook them? Once they're defrosted (assuming that's what I need to do?), do I just treat them like fresh salmon filets?

Any advice appreciated.

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  1. Don't be embarrassed! While I prefer fresh fish, I will use frozen, esp. when it's on good sale. You can get pretty decent quality these days. And I try to eat wild salmon when possible, and TJs usually has that in their frozen section. Harder to find fresh.

    Back to your question...yes, defrost first. The fridge overnight is good, though sometimes I found the fillets aren't fully thawed, so I will set the unopened packets in a bowl of lukewarm water to finish the job.

    After that, just treat them like fresh fillets and enjoy.

    1 Reply
    1. re: wyf4lyf

      I defrost right before I use it, unopened package under dripping water in the sink. NOT hot water, cause that will start to cook it.

      Frozen is a great way to get real wild salmon. We make salmon burgers from it all the time -- chop up the fillet, and add egg, chopped shallot, bread crumbs, mustard, black pepper, and fresh parsley. Fast and YUM.

    2. I bake the fillets when they're fresh and farmed- they're quite fatty. However, the I Cojo salmon I buy frozen (I think it's wild) are a bit on the dry side so I use those for salmond salad- bake the fillets, then let cool, cut up, add mayo, dill, chopped onion, celery, etc.- whatever you like- and season to taste w/ salt and pepper. Serve over salad greens.

      1. I know this is an old, old thread, but I wanted to add my 2 cents...

        Most salmon is frozen at some point between being caught and being displayed at the grocery store, unless you live in Alaska. What most people don't know is that thawing incorrectly will actually compromise the quality of the fish; you should never, ever put it into lukewarm water to speed the thawing process along.

        Frozen salmon doesn't have to be thawed at all prior to cooking; just grill, broil or fry the fish at high heat for about 5 minutes on the first side and 6-8 minutes on the second side (you want the fish to be opaque, not translucent at all). Brush with sesame oil or your favorite marinade prior to cooking, only flip it once, and be careful if pan-frying that any seasonings don't stick to the pan (I usually season only one side, after it's cooked, to prevent this). If you want other ideas on the preparation of frozen salmon, check the net, they're everywhere.