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Emile Henry ceramic cookware---anyone tried it? [Moved from Home Cooking board]

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moto Apr 4, 2006 02:54 AM

Hello, there's been interest in cassoulet on several ch boards, and I remembered a NY Times blurb last year about a higher-test ceramic cookware from the Burgundian French maker Emile Henry, the line of products is called "Flame Top". It's engineered to withstand direct stovetop heat without a diffuser, or heat under a broiler, and extreme cold to hot changes (which I would avoid doing, simply because breaking is messy and expensive). The brand boasts having a super durable finish on all of its products.

Has anyone used this brand and type of cookware, and how would you rate it? It's more expensive than le creuset (a different material, of course), so I'm reluctant to take a $160 plunge for a trial.

Thanks to all, and may you dance light-footedly before your hearths.

  1. m
    moto Apr 6, 2006 04:02 AM

    many thanks to all for the feedback. F.Fabricant of the NY Times does pretty comprehensive comparison tests between products that are supposed to do the same or similar things, prepares the same item in each of them. She recently did one on tagines. But she can't project how anything does over time and repeated use, as you have. I'll probably keep using cast iron for some things, pyrex for others, plastic for storing/refrigeration, and save my pennies to eat out and travel. kind regards to all

    1. s
      Sarah C Apr 5, 2006 09:01 AM

      A friend of mine bought an Emile Henry quiche dish and loved it, but after a few months it cracked badly while it was in the oven. She replaced it, and the same thing happened again. They are beautiful but perhaps not the most durable for repeated exposure to high heat.

      1. w
        withalonge Apr 4, 2006 12:59 PM

        I haven't tried any of the flame top line, but I do like the emile henry pie dishes, lasagna pans and ramekins. I've also enjoyed using their fait tout. but i had to do my stove top cooking in a frying pan and then pour everything in to the fait tout for baking. It would be nice to use one pot for the whole thing... but then again, i don't see how you could brown something in one of those... but otherwise, I am a big fan of the line.

        1. o
          oakjoan Apr 4, 2006 12:39 PM

          I have a large, rectangular Emile Henry ceramic baking dish. I use it whenever I make lasagne, fruit crisps, enchiladas, etc. I love it. I don't know if it can go on the stovetop (the stuff you're speaking of may be something new). It also cleans up pretty easily compared to other pans.

          1. a
            Aaron Apr 4, 2006 11:05 AM

            I got one as a birthday present from a good friend. It performs really well...all the qualities you listed live up to their description. That being said, I don't instinctively pull it out of the cupboard very often, so take it for what it's worth...I've never found a problem, but I clearly don't love cooking with it that much.

            3 Replies
            1. re: Aaron
              h
              happy Apr 4, 2006 12:39 PM

              for the price, you're better of with Le Creuset cookware, the kind you can use on the stovetop and the oven. Emile Henry can only be used in the oven...

              1. re: happy
                f
                farmersdaughter Apr 4, 2006 01:36 PM

                The new flame top line can be used on the stove top and in the oven (and frozen, too). I have a round one that's about 4 quarts, I think. I've used it for macaroni and cheese and other casseroles, and for panades that need to be started on the stovetop and finished in the oven. It's worked fine and it does exactly what I want it to do. I haven't used it on the stovetop on high heat (ie for searing meat prior to a long, slow braise) so I don't know how it does at those temperatures.

                1. re: happy
                  s
                  sally from LA Apr 4, 2006 06:07 PM

                  Yes, go for Le Creuset. I have an Emile Henri gratin dish which is badly crazed, despite only being used in the oven. This should not happen!

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