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Vanilla "Breakfast Cake" -- repost

w
wyf4lyf Mar 4, 2006 09:17 AM

Here's the recipe again for those that asked. It's soooo good! (And I'm a card-carrying chocoholic, too...but this simple, homey cake really does something for me!)

Breakfast Cake
2 sticks butter, room temperature
1C sugar
3 eggs
2-1/2C flour
2t baking powder
1t baking soda
1t salt
1C sour cream
5t vanilla

Heat oven to 350. Grease and flour a Bundt pan. Cream the butter with the sugar. Add eggs one at a time. In separate bowl, combine dry ingredients and add to batter. Stir in sour cream an vanilla until incorporated. Batter will be thick. Spoon into Bundt pan and bake about 45 minutes or until cake tester comes out clean.

Serve for breakfast, snacks, or dessert

  1. a
    Aaron Mar 4, 2006 10:29 AM

    What sized bundt pan? It doesn't look like it will make a ton of batter.

    1 Reply
    1. re: Aaron
      w
      wyf4lyf Mar 4, 2006 10:48 AM

      I only have a 10-cup Bundt pan; the batter is very thick, but rises to fill the pan.

    2. i
      Inquriring Minds Mar 4, 2006 10:56 AM

      hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
      I'm a long time baker and as I read I'm thinking - wait a minute! no cinnamon! no ginger, no brown sugar is it that good? - so I must rush to the kitchen to make it for my sleeping husband who is mad at me for an argument last night - is it good enough that he'll forgive me?

      3 Replies
      1. re: Inquriring Minds
        w
        wyf4lyf Mar 4, 2006 11:19 AM

        Yes! My husband loves this. Also, I have a teenage kid who also is a die-hard chocoholic, and he practically ate the entire thing himself. He begged me to make it for his birthday cake this year, which really suprised me.

        When I first made it, a few years ago, I was skeptical, too...like you said, no ginger, no cinnamon, etc. But I think all that butter and 5 teaspoons of good vanilla...it's really so warm and comforting. The next day, when the cake has firmed up a bit more, it's great to dunk in coffee. And it smells heavenly while it bakes, too!

        Hope it works out for you!

        1. re: Inquriring Minds
          b
          berkleybabe Mar 4, 2006 12:51 PM

          Will this work in a conventional cake pan--if so, what size. Don't have (and don't really want to acquire) a Bundt..sounds delish!

          1. re: berkleybabe
            w
            wyf4lyf Mar 4, 2006 01:58 PM

            I've never made it in a regular pan, but most Bundt cakes will work in a 13x9 pan, I think. It's angel food that *really* needs the special pan. I think the Bundt thing, at least in this case, is more for looks, and you can get a lot of slices out of it that way. Give it a try and let us know.

        2. s
          smokey Mar 4, 2006 01:08 PM

          Ohh, that sounds good. I've got a 10c angel good cake (read here: no teflon coating). Even with heavy butter/flour, things really stick. Do you think there's any hope for me using this recipe in that pan, or does the cake really want teflon to come out of the pan?

          2 Replies
          1. re: smokey
            w
            wyf4lyf Mar 4, 2006 02:01 PM

            I don't know, as my bundt pan is nonstick. But this cake is so rich in butter that I think as long as you grease and flour the pan, you'll be fine. I've been hearing that the new PAM with flour in it works really well, but I haven't tried it yet. Sorry I can't be more helpful here...

            1. re: smokey
              a
              Aaron Mar 4, 2006 02:42 PM

              I think you'll be fine. I made a bundt in an uncoated pan once (before getting a non-stick version) and it was fine. There is so much darn butter in bundt cakes. Just butter and flour the pan for extra insurance.

            2. t
              tom in sf Mar 4, 2006 03:09 PM

              Yummmm.

              I've made five (count 'em) of the ever so popular clementine cakes in as many weeks using meyers and honey tangelos and toasting the almond meal, to very good success. So, I'm liking these dense, rich cakes.

              I'm thinking this might be a nice ender to my brunch on Sunday, thinly sliced with a raspberry coulis, or a drizzle of 70% chocolate.

              Two questions for you (if you know):

              1. Do you think this might work with almond meal instead of the flour?
              2. Would this work as muffins?

              Thanks!

              1. t
                tom in sf Mar 4, 2006 03:09 PM

                Yummmm.

                I've made five (count 'em) of the ever so popular clementine cakes in as many weeks using meyers and honey tangelos and toasting the almond meal, to very good success. So, I'm liking these dense, rich cakes.

                I'm thinking this might be a nice ender to my brunch on Sunday, thinly sliced with a raspberry coulis, or a drizzle of 70% chocolate.

                Two questions for you (if you know):

                1. Do you think this might work with almond meal instead of the flour?
                2. Would this work as muffins?

                Thanks!

                4 Replies
                1. re: tom in sf
                  o
                  oakjoan Mar 4, 2006 04:51 PM

                  Tominsf:

                  Have you combined lemons and clems in one cake or made them separately?

                  1. re: oakjoan
                    t
                    tom in sf Mar 4, 2006 07:20 PM

                    Thought about it. Great idea. Haven't been able to find clems until just recently, so I've been using meyers and honey tangelos. Just got some more almond meal today at the farmers market, so doing a combo is next.

                    Like minds. :-)

                  2. re: tom in sf
                    y
                    yayadave Mar 4, 2006 08:23 PM

                    For a brunch, how about mixing chopped nuts, cinnamon, and sugar and rippling them through the batter after it is in the bundt pan? It sounds like the batter is dense enough to support this.

                    I was also thinking of a hard rum sauce type of glaze.

                    Sorry, wyf4lyf, you know chowhounds can't leave a good thing alone.

                    This recipe has the makings of a chowhound classic like Galleygirl's and Sir Gawain's cakes.

                    1. re: yayadave
                      w
                      wyf4lyf Mar 4, 2006 10:49 PM

                      It's great to try variations...but do try the original first, and then you'll know best how to "tweak." :)

                  3. c
                    Crepes Suzette Mar 4, 2006 11:30 PM

                    I made wyf4lyf's cake last week. It was wonderful, just as described - very buttery and comforting. Smelled heavenly and was especially yummy while still warm. I used the traditional bundt pan sprayed with Baker's Joy - worked perfectly. Thanks for the recipe!

                    1. d
                      debbiel May 15, 2007 07:23 AM

                      Reviving this old thread to say YUM. I made this cake last week and everyone loved it. I also tried it toasted. Very good.

                      I was tempted to do some add-ins, as suggested by others on the thread. But I heeded wyf4lyf's adivce to try the original first. It really is fantastic, and "warm and comforting" was a great way to describe it. I think add-ins would actually detract from this cake. Though, the drizzle of raspberry sounds like an okay idea.

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