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Looking for healthy recipes for the new year

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brooklynmasala Jan 2, 2006 11:46 AM

This is a good thread to start as we are all probably feeling heavy from the holiday eating (I know I am). I would love new ideas for healthy and satisfying lunches and dinners. I am not thinking salads or steamed veggies (some fat is fine even good).
What do you eat when you are feeling heavy but have a family to feed.

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    Candy RE: brooklynmasala Jan 2, 2006 12:00 PM

    I make salads with meat. A big romaine salad lightly dressed with blue cheese and slices of medium rare sizzling steak, a bowl of greens dressed with a chili lime dressing and crumbled chorizo and cheese and olives with a few strips of freshly fried corn tortillas. One of my favroites is on Epicurious btw. It is French green lentils cooked up with carrot and leeks and served over baby spinach with bacon lardons and a poached egg on top. We are carb counters and the lentils are an occasional treat but we'll be having a lot of this sort of thing for the next few weeks. I like them because they are one pot meals so to speak. Oh and soups too. I am going to get going on a creamy cauliflower soup with stilton this afternoon.

    1 Reply
    1. re: Candy
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      junglekitte RE: Candy Jan 2, 2006 08:40 PM

      fried tortillas, steak, and cheese = healthy?

      ;)

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      Val RE: brooklynmasala Jan 2, 2006 12:08 PM

      Substituting ground turkey (or chicken) for ground beef in SOME recipes works for us...for "beef" and bean burritos, I just use ground turkey instead...with the spices and beans, nobody can tell the difference. You can also do this with chili. Speaking of chili, you could try a black bean chili which uses no meat at all. Fish, lots of fish, if it's available to you. You can bake it with dijon mustard and panko or bread crumbs for lower fat (my recipe uses dijon mustard mixed with lemon juice and a little oil); also fish cooked in a provencale type of sauce is usually light and very tasty. We also like this chicken in spicy tomato sauce from Epicurious, link below, recipe uses almost no fat and is very flavorful. Leftovers make excellent tacos. Also, do you have a wok? Stir-fry recipes are pretty light and incorporate fresh vegetables; not sure if your children will eat stir-fry but why not try? Another cooking board I like reading also suggests marinating chicken in a honey-mustard-lemon marinade for great flavor; I think you can find a bunch of honey mustard chicken recipes pretty easily, too. Good luck!

      Link: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/rec...

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        Janet RE: brooklynmasala Jan 2, 2006 04:17 PM

        Since I have lost 46 pounds in the last 11 months, I feel I am an expert at this. Smaller portions, lots of fruits and veggies are the keys. Eat little meals often, never get hungry. For health reasons I have had to really limit most dairy products. That was an instant way to take off weight. But I miss my cheeses. I use homemade salsas over chicken, pork, and seafood instead of French sauces. That gives me rich flavors. We grill out many nights, or stir fry with olive oil or chicken broth. Many reduced fat snacks aren't real bad. Lots of spices, just because food is healthy, doesn't mean it has to taste bland. Use celery, garlic, onions and wine to season foods. I also use dry salad dressing mixes for flavor. All flavor, no calories.

        3 Replies
        1. re: Janet
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          Marge RE: Janet Jan 2, 2006 04:42 PM

          Congrats on the weight loss, great job! As someone who loves to spend a lot of time preparing and cooking food, this tip for the tenderest, juiciest, most flavorful lowfat indoor grilled chicken I've ever had is out of character, but here goes--marinate skinless boneless chicken breasts (pounded to about 1/2 inch thick) for 24 hours in commercial ranch dressing (I use Annie's Naturals brand cowgirl ranch, additive and preservative free...). Then, just cook on the grill pan till done.
          Delicious hot, and also cold, added to salad the next day.

          1. re: Marge
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            Dev RE: Marge Jan 2, 2006 05:22 PM

            Marge,
            Back in my college days when I used to eat meat, I also marinated the chicken cutlets in ranch dressing, then took it a step further by shaking on some soy sauce before cooking. The flavor combo is surprisingly good if you get the proportions right, though the first time someone suggested this to me I thought it sounded terrible.

            1. re: Dev
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              Val RE: Dev Jan 2, 2006 07:30 PM

              HA! This post reminds me of a recipe I tried last year called Anniversary Chicken (from allrecipes.com I think)which mixes ranch dressing with bottled teriyaki sauce for a surprisingly very flavorful dish (but the sodium content was a bit much!)...I also was leery of the combination but it's a well-received recipe on that website.

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          arifa RE: brooklynmasala Jan 2, 2006 06:44 PM

          i am all about soups and stews. it's so easy to cook a large quantity and if you avoid the soups that use tons of half and half, they are really healthy! my husband keeps laughing at me because i've declared this "the winter of soup!" i like to freeze individual portions in those reusable gladware containers for lunches.

          if you bring a container to work and let it thaw on your desk until lunchtime, it works out wonderfully. i'm vegetarian, though, so leaving meaty soups and stews on your desk to thaw might not be a good idea.

          i recently found this website, but i haven't tried any of the recipes yet. i really want to try the tomato stilton one, though.

          Link: http://www.soupsong.com/

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            pilotgirl210 RE: brooklynmasala Jan 3, 2006 12:55 PM

            A very tasty, easy dinner involves buying a bottle of Kraft Free Italian Dressing, which is water based. Cut chicken breasts into large chunks or strips and place into a 10-inch frying pan. Pour dressing into pan to a depth of about a quarter inch. Saute the chicken in the pan until all the dressing evaporates, which will result in all the spices coating the chicken pieces. This is a totally guilt-free dining experience. And delicious, too.

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              plum RE: brooklynmasala Jan 3, 2006 06:43 PM

              Good luck with your healthy recipes! I make a tasty kofte (middle eastern meatball) with ground turkey - my secret is adding a little bit of part-skim ricotta cheese to the ground meat before mixing it up. It adds nutrition and keeps the meatballs moist, along with forming a lovely crust if you grill the kofte in a nonstick pan (just be careful because ricotta can burn if the heat is too high).

              1 and 1/4 lb ground turkey or chicken
              1/2 c finely chopped onion
              1/2 c finely chopped parsley or coriander leaves
              1/2 c part-skim ricotta
              1/2 tsp salt
              1/4 tsp ground ginger
              1/4 tsp garlic powder or 2 cloves garlic, grated
              1/4 tsp paprika
              1/4 tsp cardamom
              1/2 tsp black pepper
              1 tsp sumac (sour red spice - or substitute amchoor, dried ground sour mango - or lemon zest and a bit of juice)

              Mix everything well and refrigerate for half an hour - this can be done a day ahead if you like. Form into small flattish oval meatballs, slightly more than 1oz each - you should have around eighteen of them.

              You can then fry them up in a nonstick grillpan until browned and crusty on both sides (this is tastiest), grill them, bake at 400F for 20 minutes or broil for 4 minutes per side.

              The spices, aside from the sumac, are my approximation of a popular Gulf middle eastern spice blend for chicken. If you don't want to fuss, season the turkey with a generous spoonful of mustard, some lemon zest and parsley instead.

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