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How do I cook bulgur?

  • k
  • Kristine Nov 18, 2005 09:51 AM
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I'm trying out a new recipie for the first time for a salad that requires 1 cup cooked bulgur. I have never worked with bulgur before, I know you boil it but what is the ratio is it 2 to 1? Does it expand as much as rice? (for one cup cooked should I use 1/2 cup uncooked?) also, can I use chicken broth instead of water or would the end result be too chickeny?

Any help would be greatly appreciated,
Kristine

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  1. Bulgur is easier to cook than rice, because it has been cooked a couple of times already. You don't even have to simmer it; you can simply steep it in hot broth or salted water until tender (but it's faster to simmer it), and drain off excess liquid. I find it expands between double and triple, like rice. You can use 2:1 liquid ratio and drain off excess. You can also toast the grains (in fat, if you prefer, like a pilaf/pilau) before hydrating them.

    And bulgur is good chilled, tepid and reheated.

    1. I used to use all chicken broth, but I'ver come to prefer 1/2 water, 1/2 broth. All broth started to taste too "chickeny" (or "chickeny brothy") to me.

      2 Replies
      1. re: Jalapeno

        About how long till it's done?

        Thanks again,
        Kristine

        1. re: Kristine

          I'd say about 20 minutes if you simmer it.

      2. j
        Jane Hathaway

        I make bulgur several times a week and it always turns out perfectly this way:

        1 cup bulgur
        2 cups water
        1 tsp. salt

        Boil water, add bulgur and salt, remove from heat and let sit for 20 minutes. I'm not quite sure how much it expands - maybe double? The one cup makes a lot. Good luck.

        1. Bulgar comes in various degrees of coarseness and "whole wheatiness" and the more of either, the longer the cooking time. 20 minutes simmering is usually the max in my experience; you may need less. I would definitely simmer the coarser grades, not sure just soaking would do it.