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Maple Butter

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There's a product called maple butter that's just maple syrup cooked until it's creamy (see link below). I've looked for recipes, but every recipe I've found for "maple butter" is maple syrup combined with butter. I want the 100% maple stuff. Does anyone know how to make this?

Link: http://www.vermontcountrystore.com/sh...

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  1. It's also called Maple Cream here is the recipe for Maple Candy and Maple Cream.

    Making Maple Candy & Cream

    Making maple candy & Cream at home is a fairly easy process, but extreme care must be taken because it involves very hot liquids.

    Equipment needed For Candy:

    Pure maple syrup, Grade A Light Amber or Medium Amber works best. A quart (4 cups) will make 2 pounds of candy.
    Deep cooking pot or pan.
    Candy thermometer (available at houseware store) capable of measuring to 2400 F.
    Candy molds. Rubber molds work best, or lightly greased metal or wood molds.
    A few drops of butter or vegetable oil.
    Directions For Candy:

    Fill pan partially with water and the thermometer.
    Bring to a boil, and note the temperature of the boiling water. Empty the pan.
    Place syrup in pan; using a deep pan as the boiling syrup will foam up fairly high when boiling.
    Add a few drops of oil or butter. (This helps to keep foam down).
    Boil carefully over high heat without stirring, until temperature of the boiling syrup is 320 F above the boiling point of the water, as noted earlier. Watch carefully as the temperature climbs higher. It can get too hot very quickly near the end. If your pan boils over, you'll have a real mess! If it cooks too long it can scorch, even catch fire. Watch It! (This is not a place for children nearby, as the boiling syrup is VERY hot, and can stick and burn).
    Remove from heat, and let cool for 3-5 minutes.
    Stir evenly (don't beat) until the liquid looses its gloss and starts to become opaque. This should take a few minutes, and is the tricky part to learn the exact correct moment to pour off. Stir too long and the thickened syrup will "set up" (harden) in the pan. If this happens, add a cup of water, and re-heat slowly to dissolve sugar, then start over. If you don't stir long enough, the sugar may not "set up" in the molds at all.
    Pour carefully into molds. Small aluminum foil pans can be used.
    Allow to cool, remove from molds, place on a rack to dry for a few hours...enjoy!


    Making maple cream (maple spread) at home is a fairly easy process, but extreme care must be taken because it involves very hot liquids.

    Equipment needed For Cream:

    1. Pure maple syrup, Grade A Light Amber or Medium Amber works best. A quart (4 cups) will make 2 pounds of maple cream.

    2. Deep cooking pot or pan.

    3. Candy thermometer (available at houseware store) capable of measuring to 240o F.

    4. A few drops of butter or vegetable oil.

    5. A large pan or sink full of cold water.

    Directions for Cream:

    1. Fill pan partially with water and the thermometer.

    2. Bring to a boil, and note the temperature of the boiling water. Empty the pan.

    3. Place syrup in pan; using a deep pan as the boiling syrup will foam up fairly high when boiling.

    4. Add a few drops of oil or butter. (This helps to keep foam down).

    5. Boil carefully over high heat without stirring, until temperature of the boiling syrup is 240 F above the boiling point of the water, as noted earlier. Watch carefully as the temperature climbs higher. It can get too hot very quickly near the end. If your pan boils over, you'll have a real mess! If it cooks too long it can scorch, even catch fire. Watch It! (This is not a place for children nearby, as the boiling syrup is VERY hot, and can stick and burn).

    6. Remove from heat, and place immediately into a large pan or sink of very cold water to cool. Do not move, stir, or disturb the syrup during cooling. You can gently add some ice cubes to the water bath.

    7. Cool to near room temperature (Hold the back of your hand close to the surface, its cool enough when you don't feel any heat radiating off the surface anymore).

    8. Remove from water bath and stir slowly with a wooden spoon until it looses its gloss and starts to get opaque. You will notice a change in the color of the liquid. This will take a strong hand and some time. It will get to the consistency of peanut butter when finished.

    9. Spoon into containers and keep refrigerated.

    10. Lick all the utensils and enjoy.

    8 Replies
    1. re: JMF

      holy cow. that stuff sounds like liquid napalm. sounds good, but sticky liquids around 500+ scare me. yikes!

      1. re: JMF

        Excellent; thanks!

        1. re: JMF

          Wow! Those temps sound excessively high to me -- way above the "hard crack" stage for candy making. I have trouble believing that maple sugar cooked to over 400 degrees (boiling temp of water = 212, plus 240) would be soft enough to spread. I'd expect it to be burned to a crisp!

          A quick look at other recipes on the web suggests that these are wrong -- the temps used in making candy from maple sugar are similar to those used for traditional candy making using sugar dissolved in liquid (milk, water, etc.). Perhaps there was a mixup in the way the recipe explans adjusting the temp for the boiling temp of water in the area. For example, I found these instructions in a recipe for maple candy:

          "The outside temperature dramatically affects the degree to which you boil maple syrup. 235 degrees is considered the "soft ball stage." To obtain the "soft ball stage", maple syrup is boiled 22 degrees past the boiling point of water. You will find that water will reach the boiling point at anywhere from 209 degrees to 217 degrees depending on the outside temperature and humidity."

          Note that it's supposed to be 22 degrees above the boiling temp for water, not 240 degrees above the boiling point! Perhaps someone mixed up the fact that it should be somewhere between 230-240 degrees *OR* 22 (or 24, maybe, for this recipe) degrees above the boiling temp of water.

          Link: http://www.newenglandrecipes.com/cand...

          1. re: Ruth Lafler

            I didn't look closely enough at that recipe and I think you are correct.

            1. re: JMF
              d
              Das Ubergeek

              I would agree too... sugar (the usual white kind) starts to burn at well under 400°F.

              1. re: JMF

                Looking at it more closely, and looking at this part of the recipe: "Candy thermometer (available at houseware store) capable of measuring to 240o F" I wonder if perhaps somewhere in the process of copying this recipe degree signs got translated into zeros. That would make sense.

                1. re: Ruth Lafler

                  So the correct temperature is 24 degrees above boiling.

                  1. re: JMF

                    That sounds right.

          2. You can also purchase it. It can be tricky to find locally, but I do find it from time to time.

            1 Reply
            1. re: Karl S.

              I should have said by locally, I meant in New England; I also know it's available in other maple-syrup producing regions, and probably online.

            2. This sounds like what you are after.
              Angel

              MOTHER'S MAPLE BUTTER

              1 qt. maple syrup
              1 lb. butter

              Boil maple syrup until it reaches 232 º on a thermometer.
              Cool to 100 º Cut in butter that is room temperature into
              small pieces into syrup. Beat until smooth. Delicious on
              toast, muffins, biscuits, pancakes, squash or sweet potatoes.

              1 Reply
              1. re: Angel
                d
                Das Ubergeek

                The OP specifically said that the desired result was 100% maple, no butter added.

                As for the recipe below... wow... cooking syrup to 452°F? Holy MACKEREL.

              2. This is a commercially made product. I dont think you can make it yourself.The amount of maple syrup needed would make it very very expensive to do yourself.

                We have been buying it for years at Maple Grove Farms in Vermont.

                It is wonderful on toast, as a filling for layer cakes or just on plain vanilla ice cream

                1 Reply
                1. re: Fleur

                  Yes, you can make it........you just need a whole heck of a lot of syrup. You have to boil down about 25 times the amount of syrup to get the creamy consistency needed to make the maple butter. Once you get the butter consistency, put it in a tightly sealed jar. You will note that the butter does separate a little bit with some syrup on the top. All you have to do is to stir it back into the butter and enjoy. It is like an angel dancing on your tongue :)