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pulled pork and how to flavor

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  • bearzie Nov 4, 2005 11:57 AM
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Pork Shoulder was on sale this week and thought I would try cooking it for the first time. Used the crockpot and a recipe for Carolina pulled pork. I've discarded all the fat and shredded all the meat.

As is, the flavor is bland and there is no sauce. I threw out the liquid. It seemed to fatty. Now I'm wondering what to do with the shredded pork. What would I do to it if I wanted to make enchilada or pulled pork sandwich with a BBQ sauce? Anyone have a recipe to follow from the point that I'm at?

I have alot of it so any freezing suggestions would also be appreciated.

Thanks.

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  1. I made some for a neighborhood party on Fourth of July, I just put some commercial BBQ sauce and a bottle of beer in with the cooked pork (the beer because it looked too thick), people are still talking about it.

    1. For enchialda's I would saute some onion with some diced green chili's. Then add the shredded pork, a little mexican oregano and some cayanne pepper to get it nice and spicy. Roll the mix up in some softened corn tortillas, top with enchilada sauce and cheese and bake and enjoy! Man, now I want enchiladas!

      1. Too bad about the bland flavor, after all the work. I did the same thing recently, just because pork shoulder was on sale. I got a recipe off the internet that was very tasty, and am trying to find it now. I know it took a home made rub first, and that went a long way towards the final taste.

        Tossing the juice because too fatty might have been a mistake. Maybe better to let it get cold in the fridge for a while, then scoop the congealed fat off, leaving only the good stuff.

        That doesn't help where you are now, but it might present you with an opportunity. As long as you're not that crazy about it anyway, maybe separate it into several batches, and have fun experimenting -- a little of this over here, a little of that over there. You could have family or friends try them all and give opinions.

        1. Try finishing it with a sauce of vinegar, crushed red peppers, tomato ketchup and a little water. Sorry but I can't remember proportions.

          Next time definitely try a rub for at least 12 hours, cook in the oven for about 5 hrs really low and once parially cooled pull off the bone and finish with the above vinegar sauce. Delicious as a pulled pork sandwich

          1. I second the motion for the use of BBQ sauce. We roast a picnic shoulder quite often in the oven 'cause we don't have a smoker. After the meat is shredded and the excess fat is discard, the meat is gently bathed in the BBQ sauce that our son-in-law copied down several years ago from a TV program. The BBQ sauce ingredient list is as follows...

            3/4 cup brown sugar
            6 cups chicken or beef broth or water
            2 teaspoons dry mustard
            1/3 cup white vinegar
            1 cup Worcestershire sauce
            1 (6 oz.) can tomato paste
            2 teaspoons commercial chili powder
            1 teaspoon lemon juice
            hot pepper sauce to taste (optional)

            Before meat is removed from the oven, combine all the other ingredients in a 5-quart stockpot. Bring to a boil, then lower heat to a simmer for a 1/2 hour. Gently place the pulled pork in the sauce. Serve on crusty rolls.

            I need to add something more pungent than chili powder to my sandwiches.

            3 Replies
            1. re: ChiliDude

              Hmm, I can see the appeal, but I don't think of sugar-based BBQ sauce for the traditional pulled pork sandwich. I think of the simple cider vinegar/ little bit o' ketchup/crushed red pepper Carolina sauce, and top the meat with cole slaw on a soft i.e. burger-style roll.

              1. re: Two Forks

                true, but for crock pot, rather than smoked, pulled pork, I think the traditional KC style sauces may be the best way to go to make up for the lack of smoke flavor...

                1. re: Two Forks

                  Traditional? No!

                  Super Delicious? Most definitely!

              2. You through out a lot of flavor when you discarded the juices. Next time pour off the juices and refrigerate them and then lift off the fat and add the juices back in.

                I too prefer an eastern NC type sauce all vinegary and peppery with slaw on a bun.

                You might turn that pork into a posole. I did that about a week or so ago with left over pork shoulder. You could use commercially made chili powder but I prefer to take about 3 ancho chiles and stem and seed them and 2 guajillos and do the same then toast them in a hot skillet and place in a large bowl and cover with warm water. A plate placed directly on the surface helps keep the chiles submerged. Soak for about a half hour and then place in a blender with enough of the soaking water to allow the blender to puree. In the meantime sautee a chopped onion in a lg. pot and add some minced garlic, some Mexican oregano, and the pork. Add 1 lg.can of hominy and chicken stock to cover. Bring to a boil and then reduce heat to a simmer. Strain the chile puree into the soup. Simmer about another 45 mins and serve up with warm corn tortillas.

                I know that is a pretty simplified recipe but it is a good one and makes a great cold night soup.

                2 Replies
                1. re: Candy

                  thanks for the posole recipe. Always wanted to try it and this is the way I make my enchilada sauce, so it sounds really simple to follow through with the rest of the ingredients.

                  I usually use dried pasilla peppers, but what is a guajillo? where to find--I've never seen any labled as such.

                  Thanks
                  tj

                  1. re: toodie jane

                    I get mine from Pendery's in Ft. Worth. I misspelled the name it is guajillo. They are a little darker in flavor and a bit spicier than the anchos.

                    www.penderys.com