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Too Sweet Apricot Jam -- Recipes to use it up?

  • l

I bought a big jar of apricot jam this weekend, and it's too sweet for me to eat on toast. Anyone have ideas that might use this type of jam in a recipe that cuts the sweetness with vinegar, lemon or the like?

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  1. You can make an apricot mustard cream sauce to go with a roasted pork loin. Or maybe use it as a cake filling, just decrease the sugar by some in the cake recipe to offset the sweet filling.

    1. My immediate response is to make a dessert out of it - specifically, Apricot Victorian. This is a frozen concoction that has become a favorite with my family. The recipe is from Deedy Marble, who was the original owner/chef of The Governor's Inn in Ludlow, VT.

      Governor's Inn Apricot Victorian

      1 pound canned apricot halves, drained
      1/4 cup lemon juice
      1 lb.apricot jam
      heavy cream

      Purée apricots. Add lemon juice. Melt down apricot jam. Strain out solids (I use a food mill) and add liquid apricot to purée. Freeze in shallow container.

      When ready to serve, place a small scoop (keep it small - this stuff is sweet and rich!) in a pretty stemmed glass or footed compote and cover w/2 oz. of heavy cream, which sort of solidifies over the frozen dessert.

      3 Replies
      1. re: Deenso
        d
        Deedy Marble

        I was THRILLED to see my recipe for Apricot Victorian posted at your location, Chowhound's Home Cooking.

        I have several other simple and delicious recipes, Culinary Magic.

        I also have a Box Of Recipes From The Inn's Kitchen available for $15.
        Interested?

        1. re: Deenso
          d
          Deedy Marble

          I was THRILLED to see my recipe for Apricot Victorian posted at your location, Chowhound's Home Cooking.

          I have several other simple and delicious recipes, Culinary Magic.

          I also have a Box Of Recipes From The Inn's Kitchen available for $15.
          Interested?

          1. re: Deenso
            d
            Deedy Marble

            I was THRILLED to see my recipe for Apricot Victorian posted at your location, Chowhound's Home Cooking.

            I have several other simple and delicious recipes, Culinary Magic.

            I also have a Box Of Recipes From The Inn's Kitchen available for $15.
            Interested?

          2. My immediate thought was to mix it with a spicy mustard and some wine, perhaps, and use it as a marinade or grilling sauce for pork tenderloin or chicken.

            1. My first instinct is to pair it with an unsweetened or lightly sweetened cream dessert, like topping a homemade ice cream or a cheesecake.

              I also like the notion of using it for a meat glaze - mixed with a little balsamic and warmed to spreading temperature, then used to glaze a ham, pork roast or maybe duck. I've used both orange and ginger marmalade that way, and I think your too-sweet jam would be just the thing. Might want to add a complimentary spice; I really like mace with peach or apricot, and it's really good with pork.

              1. I like all the meat glaze/marinade ideas. But first thing I thought was to thin it a little, maybe with citrus juice, and soak a sponge cake with it. Then top with a semi-sweet chocolate icing.

                1. I'd make a trifle. You can use just about anything - it's sort of a sweet dumping ground

                  the basics are
                  lady fingers or similar type cookie and/or stale pound cake (cut into strips)
                  whipped cream
                  fresh fruit -- berries are nicest, but whatever is in season and ripe including bananas
                  jam - great to use up weird sweet gift jams btw

                  In a trifle dish (or any sort of bowl really, clear glass is best)
                  line the sides of the bowl with cake if you like, or some other kind of cookie

                  you put a layer of cookie/cake and then globs of too sweet jam and a scattering of fruit topped by a layer of whipped cream (or custard)
                  followed by another layer of cake etc etc until the bowl is filled. Top layer is whipped cream and best looking fruit

                  you can put a bit of rum or other dessert alcohol or extra pear poaching liquid on one of the middle layers . . .

                  refridgerate so it can set and meld together. fabulously delicious.

                  1. j
                    JessicaSophia

                    You can also heat the jam, strain it, and keep it on hand to use as a glaze for pastries, tarts and between cake layers.

                    1. Not exactly the use you asked for, but how about...

                      Bake small circular sugar or shortbread cookies - half with "holes", circular or any shape, in the center - the other half topped with a dollop of jam. Immediately on removal from oven, put one "punched" one on top of each "jam-topped" one and cool.

                      1. Mix it with soy sauce, and use it to glaze salmon or white fish fillets, then broil them. Yum.

                        1. I usually buy large jars of apricot preserves for baking.
                          A few tips:
                          * Use melted to glaze fruit tarts
                          * Use when making thumbprint cookies or sandwich cookies.
                          * Melt, add liquer and use to moisten layers for cake or trifle.
                          * Add to Asian marinade/glaze for tibs, chicken etc.
                          You can refrigerate and keep for months.

                          I use the French BON MAMAN for the table (very cheap at SAHADI'S, cheaper actually than it is in France!)