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Shiso

  • k

I've had Hanoi-style bun cha several times recently, and am haunted by the flavor of shiso (aka perilla). Aside from coloring pickled plums, are there any other recipes that showcase this herb?

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  1. I'd be interesed in recipes too. Two of my favorite maki rolls are ume shiso (pickled plum) and saba shiso (mackerel).

    1. Shiso miso maki -- spicy miso paste wrapped in shiso leaves and cooked.

      Shiso maki -- at yakitori places, it's pork rolled with shiso and grilled.

      2 Replies
      1. re: Limster

        Hi Limster, which miso and how do you spice it?

        Thanks

        1. re: TomG

          Good question :) -- never made it myself, but have had it a restaurant. Perhaps some more knowledgeable hound will chime in.

      2. Wrap shiso around a cherry tomato, then wrap a thin slice of bacon and use a toothpick to keep the bacon closed. Pan fry these and keep them rolling (but gently, to keep them together) until the bacon is crisp, but make sure that the tomato doesn't burst.

        The only warning about eating these is that you want to eat them while still warm, but not right out of the pan - you want to survive the tomato bursting in your mouth.

        I learned this from a very creative Japanese chef who used to have his own place in NYC - one of those places that Japanese business men frequent where you get a number of omakase items, like this one. Some are sushi or sashimi, but it all depends on what he has that day. Lots of shochu, sake or beer.

        I've made them a few times and served them as appetizers. They are addictive - you can never make enough!

        1. One of the girlie magazines I read at the gym suggested using a shiso leaf as a garnish for an alcoholic drink-- vodka-tonic? Now I'm thinking, shiso-infused vodka. And a leaf would certainly make a good garnish for a saketini.

          2 Replies
          1. re: bibi rose

            In Japan they often will add fragrant herbs, flowers, even garlic to white liquor (grain alcohol, vodka etc.), steep it for a couple of weeks and drink it. I've tried it with roses and 'kuromoji no ki' - a fragrant wood used to make traditional toothpicks in Japan. I'm going to try making something similar using green shiso leaves (don't have any red shiso in Dallas). If anyone has any comments on this, please let me know. Otherwise, I will let you know how it comes out!

            1. re: Dennis

              >>In Japan they often will add fragrant herbs, flowers, even garlic to white liquor (grain alcohol, vodka etc.), steep it for a couple of weeks and drink it. I've tried it with roses and 'kuromoji no ki' - a fragrant wood used to make traditional toothpicks in Japan. I'm going to try making something similar using green shiso leaves (don't have any red shiso in Dallas). If anyone has any comments on this, please let me know. Otherwise, I will let you know how it comes out!>>

              Please do post a followup. I think I'll try this too.

              Last week I did something kind of similar-- I had too many fresh lychees. We ate some, dropped some into glasses of champagne and then-- following a suggestion I read somewhere-- put them in a jar and filled it with vodka. I'm not sure what I'm going to do with the contents of the jar (make drinks with the vodka and garnish each with an alcohol-soaked lychee?) but they smell heavenly.

          2. For a somewhat more pedestrian use, substitute shiso for your usual leaf or two of lettuce in a sandwich. You can also wrap slices of grilled meat in shiso and pop them into your mouth.

            Shiso is pretty easy to grow at home. I forgot to purchase my plant this year, but just discovered a bunch of volunteers all over the herb garden.