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Japanese yama: what to do?

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I've been given a large piece of Japanese yama. I only know of two things to do with it:

-grind in a mortar to make yamakake: a bowl of slimey yama mixed with raw tuna, soy sauce, and wasabi.
-cut it into slices as a side dish for sushi.

Does anyone have other simple uses for yama? I find it delicious, but a bit too slimey to eat alone. TIA

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    Professor Salt

    It's actually called yamaimo, ungainly translated as "mountain yam." If you google yamaimo you'll get lots of hits.

    In its grated form, it can be used as a "liquid" in batters, and finds its way into okonomiyaki batter, for example.

    3 Replies
    1. re: Professor Salt

      Thanks for the correct name! This should make things easier.

      I once had a wonderful yamaimo ice cream in Taiwan. Does anyone have any idea how this is made?

      1. re: nooodles

        You should also add to your search terms: "yamanoimo" and/or "yama no imo."

      2. re: Professor Salt

        I was actually going to suggest making okonomiyaki with your yamaimo. No sliminess.

      3. I love to slice them, about a half inch thick, then saute in vegetable oil, then wrap with a slice of nori, and dip in soy sauce.

        Also good, but a bit of a challenge to work with, is to grate the yamaimo. Then saute in vegetable oil, like silver-dollar pancakes, and again, wrap with nori and dip in soy sauce.

        If you can find sushi-quality tuna, combine grated yamaimo with the tuna, top with nori and pour over rice.

        Itadakimasu!

        1. this has been in season lately in flushing and my parents gave me two, I saw them for around $1.19 a pound in chinatown, probably you can get cheaper in flushing.

          anyway, peeled 'em, sliced em up in chunks (rotate and chop) and cooked them in a fake-hybrid-oden-red-cooked recipe where I added whole garlic cloves, shiitake mushrooms, soy sauce, water, bonito flakes and sugar. cooked for about 45 minutes and came out delicious! not a true recipe but, just figured those flavors work.

          1 Reply
          1. re: bigjeff

            It's great grated and put on top of soba or udon. Search "neba neba" soba or udon.

          2. What's the difference between "Yema" and "Yama"?