HOME > Chowhound > Home Cooking >
What are you cooking today?
TELL US

My search for Ketchup

r
rudeboy May 12, 2005 12:09 PM

In Austin TX I found (at HEB) a ketchup with "no added sugar."

"Frank's Totally Tomato" Ketchup. Ingredients: Tomato concentrate (red ripe tomatoes, Maltitolm, vinegar, salt, dehydrated onion,spice, natural flavoring).

Maltitol? I hadn't heard of it before. Yahooing reveals that it is a "sugar alcohol" and if overconsumed, it can have laxative effects. The standard tech-speak is something like this:

Maltitol is produced by hydrogenation of the disaccharide maltose, which in turn is
obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of purified starch.

I was excited to find a ketchup w/o hi-fructose corn syrup (and this one isn't overly sweet), but now I'm not sure. Has anyone researched Maltitol?

  1. d
    deibu May 12, 2005 12:26 PM

    I think you'd be better off with a sugar-added ketchup or even one with HFCS. Malitol is in lots of those sugar-free gums and candies. And, trust me, it has a very, very laxative effect, at least on me! lol

    2 Replies
    1. re: deibu
      j
      jillyju May 12, 2005 12:51 PM

      As a diabetic, I've eaten more than my share of items with Maltitol. Generally speaking (meaning--for most people), a tablespoon of a food item with Maltitol (especially if the Maltitol isn't one of the first few ingredients in the ketchup) won't have a laxitive effect. OTOH, the flavor is most definitely NOT the same as sugar.

      I guess it would depend on how serious your need to avoid sugar is--for me a product with Maltitol is a good thing, in moderation. I'd rather use sugar for something where it really matters--like an occassional bowl of ice cream!

      1. re: jillyju
        r
        rudeboy May 12, 2005 03:39 PM

        I'm not diabetic - it has run in the family and a very good friend has an adult case (and a sweet tooth, so I'm glad that some of these products are available)....I ate a lot of sugar growing up. At some point I decided to avoid it. Now, I simply don't like a lot of sugar, and I'm oversensitive to it when it is in a product. There is no way that I can drink a regular soft drink, or any "fruit juice blends." Ketchup, a la Heinz, tastes really sweet to me, and I think that I can taste the difference between sugar and HFCS.

        Maybe my body is trying to tell me something? Or I just recalibrated my palate? Anyhow, I feel somewhat lucky.

    2. j
      Jim Washburn May 12, 2005 01:01 PM

      Sun Harvest in Austin has Henry's ketchup. Ingredients: tomato puree, evaporated cane juice, white vinegar, salt, onion powder, spices. Wal-Mart supercenter has Heinz certified organic ketchup. Ingredients: organic tomato concentrate made from red ripe organic tomatoes, organic distilled vinegar, organic sugar, salt, organic onion powder, organic spice, natural flavoring.

      Jim

      1 Reply
      1. re: Jim Washburn
        r
        rudeboy May 12, 2005 03:40 PM

        I'll be hitting Sun Harvest this weekend - I'll try it. Thanks for the tip!

      2. k
        krissywats May 12, 2005 01:02 PM

        Sigh - why can't someone just make a ketchup with honey or molasses or beet sugar or just regular sugar? How hard is it?

        I feel your frustration. I don't know a thing about maltitol, though....I find all of this so frustrating.

        How the heck did they make ANYTHING 50 years ago without all of these lab created sweeteners? It's a mystery, isn't it?

        1. t
          The Rogue May 12, 2005 01:18 PM

          Basically, Maltitol is a reduced calorie bulk sweetener. Gag!

          1. c
            Carb Lover May 12, 2005 02:10 PM

            I don't use it, but have heard that Muir Glen organic ketchup is very good and doesn't contain any strange chemicals or HFCS. I like their other products. See link and click on nutritional info...

            Link: http://www.cfarm.com/muirglen/product...

            1 Reply
            1. re: Carb Lover
              k
              Karl S. May 12, 2005 04:30 PM

              It is very good. I should have remembered they don't use HFCS...

            2. c
              ChiliDude May 12, 2005 02:15 PM

              Here we go again! I make my own ketchup just to avoid the high fructose corn sweetener, a corn processing byproduct cheaper than cane sugar. HFCS is damaging to the human liver.

              The original recipe appears on page 88 of a book entitled "Legends of TEXAS BARBECUE Cookbook" by Robb Walsh published by Chronicle Books, 2002.

              Two recipes appear below, the original and my alteration with a note at the bottom of it. If hot peppers are not your thing, you can probably substitute roasted red bell peppers.

              Chipotle Ketchup – As Originally Published

              3 dried chipotle chiles
              3 dried anchos
              3 dried guajillo or pasilla chiles
              1 small white onion, diced
              5 cloves garlic, minced
              2 Tbs. packed brown sugar, or more to taste
              2 Tbs. ground cumin
              1 tsp. dried Mexican oregano
              2 cups of tomato paste
              Salt and ground black pepper to taste

              Remove the seeds and stems from all the chiles. Place the chiles, onion and garlic in a large saucepan and cover with plenty of water. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat, and simmer for about 15 minutes.

              Remove the chiles, onion and garlic from the pan with a slotted spoon and transfer to a food processor. Add the brown sugar, cumin, Mexican oregano, tomato paste and a cup of the liquid in which the chiles were cooked. Puree, adding more liquid until you reach the desired thickness. Adjust the seasonings with salt and pepper, and add more brown sugar if desired.

              Spoon the ketchup into a clean glass container and store in the refrigerator until ready for use. It keeps for several months.

              Makes about 5 cups

              Chipotle Ketchup – My Way

              4 dried chipotle chiles
              4 dried anchos
              3 dried guajillo or pasilla chiles
              ½ red onion, diced
              5 cloves garlic, minced
              2 Tbs. packed brown sugar, or more to taste
              2 Tbs. ground cumin (this may be too much)
              1 tsp. dried Mexican oregano*
              3 (6-oz.) cans of tomato paste*
              2 tsp. Kosher salt or to taste

              Remove the seeds and stems from all the chiles. Place the chiles, onion and garlic in a large saucepan and cover with plenty of water. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat, and simmer for about 15 minutes.

              Remove the chiles, onion and garlic from the pan with a slotted spoon and transfer to a blender. Add the brown sugar, cumin, Mexican oregano, tomato paste and a cup of the liquid in which the chiles were cooked. Puree, adding more liquid until you reach the desired thickness. Adjust the seasonings with salt, and add more brown sugar if desired.

              Spoon the ketchup into a clean glass container and store in the refrigerator until ready for use. It keeps for several months. Add a little vinegar to act as a preservative if you wish.

              Makes about 5 cups

              * Add one can of tomato paste to blender at a time and blend to prevent blender from binding and stressing blender motor. Mexican oregano is a species in the Verbena genus, not like Mediterranean oregano.

              Buon appetito! (My wife is of Italian heritage so I don't use French)

              3 Replies
              1. re: ChiliDude
                r
                rudeboy May 12, 2005 03:37 PM

                I'll save these recipes and try and make my own after trying the Sun Harvest Brand(s). And I just bought mex oregano for my herb garden!

                1. re: rudeboy
                  z
                  Zaheen May 12, 2005 08:07 PM

                  Hi,

                  I'm just curious, is Mexican oregano very different from normal oregano? can i substitute it? I don't think I've ever seen it before, but it may be just because I've never looked out for it.

                  Tia

                  1. re: Zaheen
                    c
                    ChiliDude May 12, 2005 11:12 PM

                    There is a subtle difference between Mexican oregano, a verbena, and Mediterranean oregano, but I never try to discourage anyone from experimenting. The latter oregano, found mostly in Italian and Greek cuisine, is in the mint family.

              2. j
                jlawrence01 May 12, 2005 02:17 PM

                Just one question ...

                Why not make your own? We used to do it quite frequently. That way you can control the ingredients that are used.

                Unfortunately, I do not have my recipes with me and cannot recall all of the ingredients off the top of my head.

                1. r
                  Ruth Lafler May 12, 2005 05:26 PM

                  If you want to avoid HFCS (a good idea), you can buy organic. There is no organic HFCS (at least not yet -- the whole point of HFCS is that it's cheap, so why make an expensive version?), so all organic products should be "safe" (one should always check the label, of course).

                  Show Hidden Posts