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Dutch oven?

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Sweet Pea Mar 1, 2005 12:39 PM

Hi all,
I've come across a lot of recipes that call for a Dutch oven. What is that, and if I don't have one, what can I use as a substitute? Thanks.

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  1. c
    Candy RE: Sweet Pea Mar 1, 2005 12:46 PM

    It is a a heavy casserole with a lid. Usually enameled cast iron. Le Creuset the French manufacturer calls theirs a French Oven it is still the same thing. They can be any number of shapes, round, oval, square etc.

    5 Replies
    1. re: Candy
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      Sweet Pea RE: Candy Mar 1, 2005 12:56 PM

      Thanks Candy. Can I use a heavy oven-proof pan instead?

      1. re: Sweet Pea
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        Candy RE: Sweet Pea Mar 1, 2005 01:59 PM

        What is is made of? If you want to brown something range top or braise on the range top instead of your oven it may make a difference. If it is pyrex or glass you may have to do the browning in another flame proof pan and then put it in a casserole. Also if the lid is not very heavy you might want to put foil over the pan before putting the lid on to helpstop some of the evaporation of liquid.

        1. re: Candy
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          RichK RE: Candy Mar 1, 2005 03:43 PM

          It can be plain old cast iron with a glass cover. No need to pay $100 for a dutch oven. The plain one does everything the fancy ones do except cost 4 times as much.

          1. re: RichK
            s
            Sweet Pea RE: RichK Mar 1, 2005 07:02 PM

            It is exactly that.

      2. re: Candy
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        Tamar G RE: Candy Mar 1, 2005 02:29 PM

        here's a picture.

        Link: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/...

      3. b
        Buttercup RE: Sweet Pea Mar 1, 2005 12:50 PM

        They are handy because they can be used on the stove and in the oven. This makes them good for such dishes as braises and stews.

        1. k
          Karl S. RE: Sweet Pea Mar 1, 2005 04:15 PM

          Originally, a Dutch oven (as the term arose in the US) was a shallow (i.e., width greater than height) covered cast iron or earthenware pot with handles that had a concave cover in which you would put burning coals/embers. It would cook from above as well as the heat of the hearth from the sides & below. So all sides of the pot would conduct heat into the cooking chamber. By dint of their heft, the pots would also continue cooking and keeping warm when removed from the direct heat.

          Le Creuset is simply (and wonderfully) enamelled cast iron.

          Must make sure that any pot handle is oven-proof....

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