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To poster "CF" - a request

k
kim shook Feb 9, 2005 10:14 PM

Below you posted a delicious sounding set of directions for how you roast a chicken. I am going to try your method and would like to know what kind of sauce/jus you prepare to go with the chicken. Thank you so much! Kim

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  1. c
    cf RE: kim shook Feb 10, 2005 12:45 PM

    Hi Kim. I just noticed your post. Thank you for your kind words and I hope you enjoy your results.

    While the chicken is roasting I put the giblets (never the liver) in a saucepan with 2 cups of aseptic packaged low sodium chicken broth. I bring it to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer it for about 20 minutes (right around the first turn of the chicken). Remove and discard the giblets and reduce the broth by half. Strain the broth and reserve.

    When the chicken is finished and resting on a cutting board pour all but a teaspoon of the fat out of the pan. Squeeze the roasted garlic from the skins and add back to the saute pan. I put the pan over medium high heat until the browned bits and garlic are sizzling and then I deglaze with 1/4 cup of dry sherry or white vermouth until a light, syrupy consistency.

    Strain the resulting liquid into the broth and bring the broth to a medium low boil in a saucepan. Taste, adjust seasonings and serve as is for a "jus".

    To bring it to more of a sauce or gravy consistency, remove from heat and whisk 1 tbsp cold butter into the broth until fully incorporated. Repeat until thickened to your liking.

    You could also mix the butter with flour, roll into a ball and continue as above for even greater thickening. Check the seasonings again in case they get somewhat muted by the butter/flour.

    I usually use kosher salt and white pepper when adjusting the seasonings but occaisonally add herbs like marjoram (my favorite) sage or fresh rosemary when the mood strikes.

    Two notes:
    1) Be very careful with the saute pan after you remove it from the oven. I have mistakenly grabbed the handle without an oven mitt at least twice and the burn you receive is shockingly painful.
    2) Empire kosher chickens sometimes come with just the neck included as giblets, sometimes they come with more.

    Extra tip: As the cook make sure you get the two greatest pieces of meat from your chicken for your efforts - the oysters. The oysters are tender, flavorful, round nuggets of white meat located on the back of the chicken right above where the thighs connect to the bird (sort of the love handle area of the chicken). Unbelievably tasty!

    I hope you enjoy the recipe and would love to hear your results.

    cf

    1. c
      cf RE: kim shook Feb 10, 2005 12:50 PM

      Hi Kim. I just noticed your post. Thank you for your kind words and I hope you enjoy your results.

      While the chicken is roasting I put the giblets (never the liver) in a saucepan with 2 cups of aseptic packaged low sodium chicken broth. I bring it to a boil, reduce the heat and simmer it for about 20 minutes (right around the first turn of the chicken). Remove and discard the giblets and reduce the broth by half. Strain the broth and reserve.

      When the chicken is finished and resting on a cutting board pour all but a teaspoon of the fat out of the pan. Squeeze the roasted garlic from the skins and add back to the saute pan. I put the pan over medium high heat until the browned bits and garlic are sizzling and then I deglaze with 1/4 cup of dry sherry or white vermouth until a light, syrupy consistency.

      Strain the resulting liquid into the broth and bring the broth to a medium low boil in a saucepan. Taste, adjust seasonings and serve as is for a "jus".

      To bring it to more of a sauce or gravy consistency, remove from heat and whisk 1 tbsp cold butter into the broth until fully incorporated. Repeat until thickened to your liking.

      You could also mix the butter with flour, roll into a ball and continue as above for even greater thickening. Check the seasonings again in case they get somewhat muted by the butter/flour.

      I usually use kosher salt and white pepper when adjusting the seasonings but occaisonally add herbs like marjoram (my favorite) sage or fresh rosemary when the mood strikes.

      Two notes:
      1) Be very careful with the saute pan after you remove it from the oven. I have mistakenly grabbed the handle without an oven mitt at least twice and the burn you receive is shockingly painful.
      2) Empire kosher chickens sometimes come with just the neck included as giblets, sometimes they come with more.

      Extra tip: As the cook make sure you get the two greatest pieces of meat from your chicken for your efforts - the oysters. The oysters are tender, flavorful, round nuggets of white meat located on the back of the chicken right above where the thighs connect to the bird (sort of the love handle area of the chicken). Unbelievably tasty!

      I hope you enjoy the recipe and would love to hear your results.

      cf

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