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cooking kohlrabi

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shameless Feb 5, 2005 08:47 PM

I am cooking Kohlrabi for the first time and I am trying to figure out what to do with it.

Does it need to be cooked long and slow like Beets or Turnips? Many of the recipies I have found seem to cook it fast and not "over" cook it. From the look of it, I can see how that would work.

Any suggestions? Thanks!

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    emdb RE: shameless Feb 6, 2005 06:20 AM

    I have cooked kohlrabi like broccoli-- steamed until crisp tender, or roasted. I'm not a huge fan of the flavor, which I find to be too mild for the amount of chewing that goes on (it can be fibrous) It goes well with the flavors that work well with broccoli and brassicas. I have also sliced it thin on a mandolin and layered it in a gratin with white turnip or rutabaga, to which (I believe) it is related. If I recall correctly, my favorite version of it involved cutting it into small chunks, 1/2 inch or so, steaming until just tender, and then tossing it in a skillet with some already crisped bacon, sauteed onion, a tablespoon or two of the bacon fat, a little dijon mustard, some salt and pepper, and some heavy cream.

    Good luck.

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      MkeLaurie RE: shameless Feb 6, 2005 05:00 PM

      We actually prefer it cold, sliced thinly with a little salt or made into a slaw.

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        Eldon Kreider RE: shameless Feb 7, 2005 11:18 AM

        Fibrous kohlrabi comes from plants that were too old when harvested and is aggravated by growing at high temperatures and long time between harvest and eating. Growing in high temperature can produce a strong flavor as well.

        I prefer tender young kohlrabi from the farmers' markets in Chicago in early summer and fall for slicing and eating raw. Light steaming or sauteeing should leave some crunch. My wife sometimes uses kohlrabi with other stir-fried vegetables. Decidedly non-Chinese but a good alternative for water chestnuts with more flavor.

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          Eldon Kreider RE: shameless Feb 7, 2005 11:24 AM

          Fibrous kohlrabi comes from plants that were too old when harvested and is aggravated by growing at high temperatures and long time between harvest and eating. Growing in high temperature can produce a strong flavor as well.

          I prefer tender young kohlrabi from the farmers' markets in Chicago in early summer and fall for slicing and eating raw. Light steaming or sauteeing should leave some crunch. My wife sometimes uses kohlrabi with other stir-fried vegetables. Decidedly non-Chinese but a good alternative for water chestnuts with more flavor.

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