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Warning: Galleygirl's pear tart is harmful

  • h

I read all the hype, so I had to try Galleygirl's pear tart for myself.

Warning: this tart/cake is seriously custardy, clafouti-y, and moist, Use the juiciest, most fragrant pears, and this tart is dope. And you will end up eating the whole thing by yourself, get a stomachache, and gain weight.

So don't do it!

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  1. Could someone please repost the recipe or provide a working link to it? Since the board switch, it looks like the links pointing to it (see thread below) don't work anymore. Thanks.

    9 Replies
    1. re: Spade

      Here you go. And there are a bunch of threads below discussing which glaze to use (sugar? apricot jam?); how to adjust for a 9-in. springform pan; the best accompaniment (ginger ice cream, apparently), etc.

      Link: http://www.chowhound.com/topics/show/...

      1. re: Marty L.

        I have made the tart several times using a 9" pan. A couple of times I increased the recipe by half- but one time I fogot- and it was fine.

        The apricot glaze gave it a nice finish.

        This tart is very popular in our house!

        Thanks Galleygirl!

        1. re: edinaeats
          j
          jennyantepenultimate

          For Xmas dinner dessert spread, tired of the usual pumpkin pie or cheesecakes, I made super rich triple chocolate brownies, the Christmas crackers recipes posted on here which included toffee and chocolate layers and the pear tart for myself since I prefer non-chocolatey desserts. The pear tart was gone first! Usually people can't get enough chocolate but the simple, rich tart just beat them all, hands down.

          1. re: jennyantepenultimate

            How about posting the triple chocolate brownie recipe? That sound decadent.

            1. re: Neta
              j
              jennyantepenultimate

              They are an Epicurious recipe. I add in some toasted walnuts over half for those who like nuts.

              Link: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/rec...

          2. re: edinaeats

            I have made this pear tart in a 9 in. pan and it was just fine. Have just sprinkled white sugar on top before baking and that was wonderful, but will try the apricot jam next time. This looks like such a simple, ordinary recipe, but oh my, it's really great. Has to go down as one of the 10 best recipes I've made in 2004. Thanks galleygirl for a truly wonderful tart!

          3. re: Marty L.

            I offered it at Thanksgiving with a spoonful of the banana ice cream posted on this board. A guest from France really liked it as well as Queen Buchanan. Most of the kids still went for the pumpkin pie. This tart is the find of some time. Very simple. Very tasty, even the morning after. Thank you GalleyGirl and banana ice cream recipe poster.

            Link: http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/rec...

          4. re: Spade

            I adapted it after testing it twice. It is quite amazing!

            Pear Tart

            Adapted from Chowhound Galley Girl

            This is more like a dense, rich, buttery cake, made heavy by the pear juice that infuses it. Only caveat: Don't overcook. It's even better the next day!

            1 stick butter, softened
            3/4 cup sugar
            1 teaspoon vanilla
            2 eggs
            1 cup flour
            1 teaspoon baking powder
            1/2 t. salt
            Vegetable spray
            2 or 3 ripe juicy pears, peeled, cored, and cut into eighths

            Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Cream the butter, sugar, and vanilla with a hand-mixer. Add the eggs, one at a time, and blend.

            Combine the flour, baking powder, and salt, and add it to the butter mixture. Don’t over-beat the mixture.

            Spray an 8-inch spring form pan with the vegetable spray. Spread the batter in it. Press the pear slices into the batter in a pinwheel pattern. Cram in as many as you can. The batter will rise and cover the pears, so they don’t have to look perfect. The more pears, the moister the cake will be.

            Bake just until a skewer comes out clean, about 45-55 minutes. If you have any doubts, underbake. Start testing with the skewer at 45 minutes. You don’t want it to dry out. As it cools, the tart will pull away from the sides of the pan nicely.

            Yield: 4-6 servings

            1. re: Tom Steele
              b
              Barham Turner

              Very nice write-up of the recipe. I'd like to report that the cake is not only the simplest baked dish you'll ever make, it's also durable. I baked one a week ago; served it at dinner (to raves); packed the leftover cake up the next day and drove it out to Palm Springs where it was brought out at one meal and enjoyed, then shoved around in the refrigerator (basically forgotten) for 5 days. Then we drove the last slice back to LA and ate it for lunch yesterday. It travels well and it was, if anything, even moister and tastier one week later.

              Key, as everyone has said, is the quality/ripeness of the pears, and not overcooking. Get an 8-inch springform pan if you don't have one. I picked one up recently for $6.50.

          5. I made this tart for my departments pot luck Christmas luncheon at the bosses house. I made it in a 13x9 pan and it turned out great. Everyone loved it! I served it with vanilla ice cream and warm caramel sauce. I also had peeled too many pears, so I decided to make some pear sauce (like apple sauce) and served that on the side too!

            1. okay, am i the only one who has had trouble with this tart? i made it once (in a 9-inch springform) and it turned out sandy and dry. neither me nor my guests really liked it.

              i must have done something wrong, but i'm not sure what. did i overbake it? i want to try it again because people rave about it so, but am not sure what to adjust. i thought i followed the recipe to a tee!

              can someone help me out?

              3 Replies
              1. re: missmasala

                Sounds like you definitely overcooked it, especially since you did it in a 9 inch pan instead of an 8 inch pan, which would reduce the cooking time. If you go back to the original recipe, it says to be very careful of overcooking. For a 9 inch pan, I would start checking it at around 40 minutes, and you probably won't need to cook it for more than 45-50.

                1. re: missmasala

                  I used an 8" pan and it was perfect after 45 minutes of baking time. Very moist and delicious!

                  1. re: missmasala

                    I used a 9 in. pan as well, but my tart turned out great. I cooked it about 50 min.--but I used really ripe and juicy pears, which I think is the trick. Try it again, with the ripest pears you can and I think you'll love it-maybe sprinkle a bit of sugar on top before baking for a nice crunch as well. Check it often, starting at 40 min.(every oven is different and also depends on humidity) and whatever you do-- don't overbake it, it's better underbaked than over.

                  2. a
                    A Fish Called Wanda

                    I am sorry for this stupid question, but what attachment should I use if I am making it in a kitchen aid stand up mixer. Should I use the wire whip (the thing that looks like a big whisk) or a paddle (the thing usually used for cookies)?

                    Does the type of pears matters? I got some anjou at home -- would that work?

                    Thanks!

                    3 Replies
                    1. re: A Fish Called Wanda

                      Use the paddle for batters, cakes and such.

                      The wire whip is used for whipping cream and egg whites and anything else you want to incorporate A LOT of air into.

                      Regarding the pears, the emphasis was on ripe & juicy.

                      1. re: A Fish Called Wanda

                        Yep, the paddle is the one I used when making this tart. I used really ripe anjou pears and the results were wonderful. I think they just need to be ripe and juicy.

                        1. re: A Fish Called Wanda
                          j
                          jennyantepenultimate

                          This recipe works with canned pears if you can't get any ripe ones.

                        2. What if you made this cake with apples?

                          1 Reply