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Sauce for Beef Wellington?

f
farmersdaughter Dec 27, 2004 01:34 PM

I'm making Beef Wellington for New Year's eve and am looking for a recipe for a simple and tasty sauce to serve with it, maybe some kind of red wine reduction. Cook's Illustrated has one with their Beef Wellington recipe which is more complicated than I want to prepare given all of the other dishes I am cooking that night. Any suggestions?

  1. w
    Wendy Lai Dec 27, 2004 01:39 PM

    I'm making Beef Wellington for NYE too!
    I saw a recipe for it Food & Wine magazine a couple of months ago (sorry can't remember which). I'll try to post tomorrow.

    what other sides are you making?

    1 Reply
    1. re: Wendy Lai
      f
      farmersdaughter Dec 27, 2004 01:48 PM

      We decided to go fancy retro this year, so as side dishes for the meat I'm doing Julia Child's Potatoes Dauphinois, and a wonderful slow cooked (stovetop) carrot and endive dish from one of Marcella Hazan's cookbooks.

      Before that we are having a foie gras appetizer (courtesy of our guests) and a brothy tomato soup with orange and cumin.

      After the meat, we're having a cheese course and Baked Alaska for dessert, also courtesy of our guests.

      Sounds like a lot of food but there are some big eaters!

    2. 2
      2chez mike Dec 27, 2004 08:48 PM

      I think a bearnaise would be great with beef wellington.

      5 Replies
      1. re: 2chez mike
        j
        Jim H. Dec 27, 2004 09:18 PM

        Bearnaise is the classic sauce for BW

        1. re: Jim H.
          e
          Eldon Kreider Dec 28, 2004 02:23 PM

          IIRC in its 1950s and 1960s heyday, Beef Wellington was served with sauces derived from Sauce Espagnole: sauce madere, mushroom and madeira sauce, sauce perigordine or other brown sauces with truffles. Bearnaise works well with simpler beef filet preparations but strikes me as unsuited for a preparation where the meat is covered with foie gras or liver pate (possibly truffled), then black truffles or mushroom duxelles, and then encased in pastry. Obviously, most versions used mushrooms instead of truffles. Even using canned truffled fois gras mousse was very much better than chicken livers and mushrooms.

          1. re: Eldon Kreider
            f
            farmersdaughter Dec 28, 2004 03:12 PM

            I agree with your assessment of bearnaise sauce. Totally appropriate for a plain roasted tenderloin but not this prep. Do you think a bordelaise type sauce might work? Or a red wine/beef stock reduction?

            1. re: farmersdaughter
              e
              Eldon Kreider Dec 28, 2004 05:28 PM

              Bordelaise is another sauce more or less derived from sauce espagnole that was used with beef wellington. A red wine/beef stock stock reduction, perhaps with a little tomato puree added, is a logical modernization a la the no longer new nouvelle cuisine. I think it would go quite well.

        2. re: 2chez mike
          m
          MzMaggie Dec 29, 2004 05:35 PM

          Take a cup of good red wine, a cup of good beef stock & reduce it down to about 1 cup. Add a pat of butter at the end. Good stuff!

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