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spice substitution

  • r

I just saw a recipe in the December issue of Martha Stewart Living for a butternut squash and celery root soup. It sounds great, but the problem is that the only spice it calls for is fennel seed, which I hate. Can anyone suggest a substitution that would work with the celery root, squash and the usual other ingredients (onions, garlic etc).

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  1. Coriander seed?

    1. Would caraway seed work for your recipe?

      1. Lawry's seasoned salt
        or Thai Spice blend by Spice Hunter

        1. Toast some cumin seed in a skillet and then grind it up. That flavor should work with the squash

          6 Replies
          1. re: Candy

            That was actually my first thought......most people don't have cumin seed, so I said coriander. I've been doing the cumin seed toasting and grinding for the past year. I will never buy ground cumin again!

            1. re: rudeboy

              What do you grind it in? I am planning to get a small coffee grinder to use just for spices, but I am afraid that the smell/flavor of some of the stronger spices will linger in the grinder. I like cumin alot, but I find it takes over everything around it.

              1. re: ruth arcone

                I always rough grind my whole seed spices in my mortar & pestle... It's meditative, and i really enjoy it.

                If I want a finer grind, I add a bit of coarse salt to the mortar as well... then just adjust the seasoning in the dish accordingly.

                1. re: ruth arcone

                  a (separate) coffee grinder works fine for spices. after each use brush spices out with a dry pastry brush (or a little cheapo paintbrush from the hardware store) then wipe it with a slightly damp paper towel.

                  1. re: petradish

                    I use the coffee grinder for dry spices, and the little $30 kitchenaid processor when adding garlic, herbs, or other things with moisture.

                    I still haven't seasoned my mortar and pestle, and I bought it in mexico four years ago!

                  2. re: ruth arcone

                    I use a mortar and pestle for that sort of thing. And yes, toasting the cumin seed before grinding really brings out the best flavor

              2. nutmeg