HOME > Chowhound > Kosher >
What's your latest food project? Get great advice
TELL US

Rendered Chicken Fat

f
fp Aug 7, 2003 05:39 PM

Hi,

I was wondering if you could direct me to sources of rendered chicken fat. I do recall buying it solid in small plastic containers at the supermarket when I lived in DC, but I have not been able to locate anything in San Francisco. Perhaps you can help.

Thanks.

  1. c
    ChowFun (derek) Aug 8, 2003 03:17 AM

    Andronico's carries it, as does Albertson's on Fulton.

    2 Replies
    1. re: ChowFun (derek)
      s
      Susan H Aug 8, 2003 09:37 AM

      Buying chicken fat? Why not just make your own? Take the fatty parts of the skin and the lumps of fat out of your chicken, put them into a cast iron frying pan with a chopped onion, and cook until the fat is rendered. Pour off the fat, and put the pieces of skin and onion onto a slice of challah and feel your arteries harden as you eat. This is the way my grandmother and mother did it.

      1. re: Susan H
        t
        try2cook Jan 30, 2010 01:12 AM

        This sounds delicious! I can't believe how much chicken fat I've wasted. I always tossed it out when cooking chicken. Argh!

    2. d
      DeisCane Aug 8, 2003 10:23 AM

      This is what you're looking for, you can buy it online:
      http://www.mykoshermarket.com/detail....

      Empire brand stuff is sold at these stores in the 415 area:
      Israel Kosher
      5621 Geary Blvd
      San Francisco
      (415) 752-3064

      Albertsons Store 7128
      1515 Sloat Blvd
      San Francisco
      (415) 681-4300

      Albertsons Store 7065
      731 E Blithedale Ave
      Mill Valley
      (415) 388-8309

      Bell Market 848
      1599 Tiburon Blvd
      Belvedere Tiburon
      (415) 435-0695

      1. s
        Sharon Lebewohl Aug 8, 2003 09:41 PM

        Definitely make your own schmaltz. It is easy and you will have the benefit of the gribines (cracklings) which you won't get with store bought schmaltz. On Atkins, you can even eat the gribines like popcorn at the movies!

        4 cups of fat and skin from chicken* (goose schmaltz is delicious too.
        Kosher salt
        pepper
        1 cup onion rings
        A few cloves of garlic

        Place the fat in a heavy skillet and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
        Cook uncovered over a low heat. When the fat begins to brown, add onions and garlic and continue to cook until the gribines are golden brown and crunchy.
        When cool, strain to separate the schmaltz from the gribines.

        Just keep adding the fat and skin to a bag in the freezer until you have 4 cups. I keep 1 bag in the freezer for saved up fat and another for bones for my chicken soup.

        2 Replies
        1. re: Sharon Lebewohl
          g
          goldenwhisknyc Aug 19, 2008 02:00 PM

          About how long does it take to render the fat and wind up with those crunchy gribines?
          Do I need to cut up the skin or just pull it off and put in the skillet? Thanks.

          1. re: goldenwhisknyc
            k
            kiddush hopper Jan 31, 2010 09:23 AM

            you should cut the fat and skins into smal pieces. i find this to be much easier with kitchen shears, rather than a knife.

            tit doesnt take long at all. it depends on the amount you are doing, but its not a 3 hours long process. think of it more along the lines of "frying up chicken skins and fat" rather than "rendering"

            the schmaltz is just a by-product of frying it up

        2. s
          sharon lebewohl Aug 9, 2003 01:58 AM

          Definitely make your own. With homemade schmaltz you get the benefit og the gribines which you don't get with the store bought variety. On Atkins, you can eat the gribines like popcorn at the movies!

          4 cups chicken fat and skin ( goose schmaltz is terrific)
          Kosher salt
          Peppper
          1 cup onion rings
          A few cloves of garlic

          Place the fat in a heavy skillet and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
          Cook uncovered over a low heat. When the fat begins to melt and turn slightly brown, add onions and garlic and continue to cook until the gribines are golden brown and crunchy.
          When cool, strain to separate the gribines from the schmaltz.

          9 Replies
          1. re: sharon lebewohl
            d
            DeisCane Aug 9, 2003 06:18 PM

            That's great, but in the States, kosher goose is very tough and expensive to get. I wish that weren't the case as I love goose and my Hungarian wife misses it dearly.

            1. re: DeisCane
              i
              Irwin Koval Aug 10, 2003 03:01 AM

              DeisCane:Your posting, made me think of "Kosher Goose Pastrumi", that was available at many Delicatessens in NYC Metro area for many years. There should be good sources for Kosher Goose, since they are being raised in the Catskill's by Isreali/Americans, for livers, used for Pate's. etc. I remember rendering Goose Fat, with Gribiens. Chicken never tasted as good.

              1. re: Irwin Koval
                j
                john farago Aug 10, 2003 05:23 PM

                i'll be darned if i can find a catskills goose farm, much less a kosher one; the places i find are all raising duck for their livers and pate, and i don';t think they're kosher, but i haven't really checked; in any event i'm not sure that geese forcefed for lfoie gras would be the same -- in duck it's certainly somewhat different

                i'd like to know a good fresh goose source in the NYC area period; i can get great geese, but it's seasonal, sort of Thanksgiving to Christmas; the rest of the time they're lean and thankless

                1. re: john farago
                  i
                  Irwin Koval Aug 10, 2003 06:41 PM

                  That's why I responded as I did. I know that there are Farms that raise Geese, because we have purchased European type Force Fed Goose Livers, without any Kosher authorization. But , the availability of supervised kasharuths is available in the area, if there is a market for the poultry. I'm not sure what is done with the Geese utilized in this manner, but they are not old for using as Roast Goose, as they sell at premium prices in Europe. I've purchased fresh non-kosher goose in NYC, on order. Check with any Kosher sites about Geese in NYC, we have gotten them several times in Seattle, during the Holidays, so it should be easier to aquire them in NYC.

                  1. re: Irwin Koval
                    j
                    john farago Aug 11, 2003 07:09 AM

                    i've also purchased fresh non-kosher goose in NYC; around the holidays it's incredible; other times it's more or less fat free and tough (at holiday times I can render three pints of fat from a goose; other times of the year less than a pint); I'm not sure whether it's because the geese are not really fresh, or because they're simply only bred (or bred properly) around the holidays or whether their fat buildup is seasonal

                    in Hungary, the geese I find for cooking are nowhere near as fatty asd they are here; I'm not sure whether they were forcefed and all the fat is msomehow mystically directed to the liver, or whether instead they're simply not bred for foie gras (and if so, where are the bodies of the foie gras geese? come to think of it, since all these geese seem to come with livers, these don't seem to have had their livers removed)

                    i'm not a real kosher knowledgeable person, but would have thought that to get a goose labelled kosher would require more than simply butchering it properly (is this wrong?); in any event it's pretty odd, given how central the goose was to mittel-european kosher cooking, that there really doesn't appear to be a market for kosher goose year round

                    as to rendered goose fat, if one is willing to accept non-kosher relatively bland product, the Hungarian meat Packing shop on Second Ave. and 81st St (or is it 82?) stocks it all the time -- they refer to it as "goose lard" not a terribly kosher-friendly way of putting it

                    1. re: john farago
                      d
                      DeisCane Aug 11, 2003 10:43 AM

                      My butcher told me that, aside from the Thanksgiving batch that his source gets every year, he only knows of going out to NJ with a shochet and doing it yourself.

                      1. re: DeisCane
                        u
                        uncle moishy Aug 11, 2003 01:11 PM

                        Found the site below for kosher goose liver. Also, searching here (Chowhound) for "kosher goose" yields 40+ hits, but I didn't dig any deeper.

                        Link: http://www.geocities.com/papagoce

                        1. re: uncle moishy
                          d
                          DeisCane Aug 11, 2003 01:43 PM

                          Anyone ever email that person in Reseda?

              2. re: DeisCane
                m
                Midas Gold Dec 28, 2003 12:43 AM

                We've purchased frozen whole kosher geese, packaged under the International Glatt label (Debreciner hechsher, I think?) at Landau's kosher market on 18th Ave in Boro Park. At least they were there about a year ago.

            2. j
              Juliagrownup Jan 31, 2010 02:08 AM

              I render the fat (pregl the schmaltz) differently. Cut the skin into 1/2 inch dice. Put diced skin, chopped onion and the fat from the chicken (especially the fat near the tail end of the cavity) and put them into the frying pan in a half inch of WATER. Simmer until the water is mostly evaporated (watch the steam coming out and run to the stove when it stops). Uncover and fry until the onion and pieces of skin are golden brown. Strain the fat into a freezer container. When it has cooled enough, put in the refrigerator. After it is chilled you can freeze it. I don't add salt and pepper so the seasoning can be controlled while cooking.

              Show Hidden Posts