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Dutch Food?

g
graduate Mar 4, 2004 04:25 PM

What is it like? Any online websites for food in Holland?

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  1. d
    dogmom RE: graduate Mar 4, 2004 09:35 PM

    links have been posted recently, look around for "amsterdam" threads...

    it's been awhile since i was there, & i didn't eat out much, mostly in people's homes. lots of indonesian, both in restaurants and homes, a bachelor even cooked bami goreng for me one time...breakfast included wonderful bread with wonderful butter & shaved dark chocolate (vlok) on top...chicken croquettes are popular, there were lots of little "broodje" stands in the hague selling small sandwiches (rosbief was what i usually had)...frites with a mayonaissey "frites sauce", kind of like a tartar sauce, instead of with ketchup or vinegar...

    "native" dutch food tends toward the heavy side, befitting a cold country, pea soup & the like. all the dairy stuff (cheese, yogurt, butter) is wonderful.

    2 Replies
    1. re: dogmom
      j
      Jan Jansen RE: dogmom May 23, 2004 05:44 PM

      Dear Dogmom,

      I would like to agree with your wonderful impression of and report on Dutch food. Perhaps I may add some remarks.

      There is no such thing as Dutch food. I mean, not actually. Apart from Dutch breakfast and lunch, on which I will deal later, Dutch dinner food tends to be obsolete, even by Dutch standards. It consists of heavy "erwtensoep", "balkenbrij", "boerenkool", "andijvie stamppot", "hutspot", "ham met lof", "zuurkool" etc. etc. Do forget these heavy meals, unless you are an antropologist on your way to a thesis on Dutch original food.

      Instead, in the Netherlands we have adopted food first from our former colonies (Indonesia, Suriname, Southy Africa), and later from people who settled in our country (Jews from Central Europe, Chinese, Italians, Maroccans, Turks). You absolutely will have a more satisfying visit to our country when you are aware of these culinary influences and succumb to their charms and flavours.

      A Dutch beakfast and lunch is an elaborate affair: various kinds of bread, cheese, meat, honey, jams, sweet chocolate ("vlokken"), "muisjes", fresh fruit, different sorts of milk, youghurt, tea, coffee. At lunch you get in addition something cold (mostly fish: "haring" or smoked herring) and something warm: a "kroket", or soup, a "saucijzenbroodje", a "worstbroodje", a "soufflé".

      I hope you can manage this information.

      1. re: Jan Jansen
        k
        Kirk RE: Jan Jansen May 23, 2004 06:36 PM

        Thanks, Jan. I managed the information. Does anyone (except anthropologists) eat zuurkool, etc.?

        Of the colony foods and the "settlers," what would you say are the best? I have had rijstaffel many times, but is there anything "newer" that you would recommend?

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