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Flushing's Best

  • b

What is, hands down, the BEST Chinese restaurant in Flushing? And if you know of any non-Chinese winners I guess that's cool too...Thanks!
--Billy

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  1. One vote for Chao Zhou, on Main Street. The house-smoked duck is amazing.

    BTW, last week at CZ the waitress tried to talk my wife and I out of ordering the water celery, saying it was "too smelly." We persisted, and it wasn't.

    1. I don't know how to answer this question because I love a little of everything, but here are some good places:

      Homefood: (38-05 Main St., 718-463-6868) has no-nonsense homecooked Chinese food with a Taiwanese flavor. Everything there is generally pretty good, but be sure to try the scallion pancakes which are thick, chewy, and made with lots of flavor-absorbing scallions!

      Juo Fun Garden: (42-09 Main St., 718-888-0011) has really good scallion pancakes too. They're translated as "hand-made pancakes" and they're a lot thinner and crisp than the Homefood kind (kinda reminds me of indian roti). I can't speak for the other food...I just remembered that the food off the dinner package (you get 3 dishes for a set price) came in small plates and weren't good). Probably a good idea to stick with the chef's specialties.

      Yang Tze River Restaurant: (135-21 40th Road off Main St., 718-353-8500) has delicious Shanghai snacks. Recommended dishes: big sesame studded-scallion bread, radish soubing, any stir-fried vegetable, scallion pancakes with beef, fried buns stuffed with chives & egg, panfried buns, dumplings, soup dumplings, shanghai style stir-fried noodles, gluten & black mushroom, and crispy fried chicken. Why it's great: it's cheap and you get soup and dessert (red bean soup) with your meal.

      Shanghai Tide (135-20 40th Road, across from Yang Tze River Restaurant, 718-661-0900): good soup dumplings...much less fatty and more delicate-flavored than Joe's. Their version of radish soubings is also good.

      Sun Young Spring: (41-27 Main St., 718-321-7392) has good noodles and a very good version of Beef with pancakes roll-up. I usually go there for a bowl of noodles or stir-fried rice cakes so I can't vouch for the other food.

      Nam Bo Won: (156-26 Northern Blvd., 718-886-1368) is a Korean/Chinese joint with good noodle dishes as well. A different twist on typical Chinese noodle dishes.

      Zhu Ji: (take out stand a few doors down from Chao Zhou on 41st I believe?) has really good pan-fried and steamed vegetable/pork buns. It's a madhouse in the morning, but if you can brave the rude attitudes, it's definitely worth a try. They also sell the fried dough/sesame bings in the morning with soy milk, small meat buns, sticky rice wrapped in bamboo, and rice rolls stuffed with dried pork, fried dough, etc. Oh, there's no English name for it, but the sign is red, with 4 white Chinese characters arranged in a grid.

      I know a bunch of good Cantonese seafood places too, but I'm more of a noodles/bun kinda girl myself.

      10 Replies
      1. re: m00ncakes

        Forgot...for Nam Bo Won, order the zha jiang mian. it's black bean sauce with other things over thick noodles. very good and not spicy like the usual chinese version.

        1. re: m00ncakes

          Wow, thanks!
          Since you're a "bun kinda girl," what are your favorites for buns??? I prefer the steamed ones myself...

          1. re: Billy

            Hmm, buns...
            I used to always get the pan-fried vegetable pork buns at Zhu Ji because the steamed ones were never ready in the morning when I stopped by. I'm sure the steamed version is just as good, but in my opinion, anything pan-fried is just more savory. Not a fan of roast pork buns, but I always had to have the mini ones at KB Garden. I recently started liking flaky pastries after trying the radish soubings at Yang Tze River although having too much can cause a grease overload.

            Oh, and if you like dumplings, the ones at Mayflower (food court/bakery on Main Street next to the LIRR station) are also pretty finger-licking good.

            And just as a disclaimer, my taste in food tends to be pretty simple. I've never really appreciated a great shark fin soup or braised sea cucumber. So...just keep that in mind if you order any of my "recommended" dishes.

            Enjoy!

            1. re: m00ncakes

              to continue on the "simple is good" philosophy, the best restaurants in Flushing are really home-style, and you might be embarassed to eat there, unless you're with food enthusiasts who don't mind the environs . . . for a quick and filling takeout lunch or dinner, the steamtabes at Mayflower are usually really good. I think it costs $3.95 for three (or maybe four) dishes, over rice, plus a soup. Big selection that changes daily (even hourly) . . . you could eat there for a week and not have the same meal twice . . . there are now plenty of these "3 dish + soup" places, often found in chinese supermarkets and such, but the Mayflower one is one of the better ones in Flushing . . .

              1. re: bigjeff

                your right...check out the steamtables inn Flushing supermarkets for rockin food for under $4!

              2. re: m00ncakes

                buns, mmm...!

                my favorites tend to be the savory ones, rather than the sweet...for a few vegetarian options since the savory buns tend to involve meat: i love the "mushroom bun" at Yi-Mei Bakery on Roosevelt (right by the train entrance)...it is spicy dried radish, shitake mushrooms and probably some other stuff in a baked sweet bun...very savory and delicious. I haven's seen this version anywhere else, so if anyone else knows of a spot, let me know! Another pick from the same place, which is pretty oily (better than the straight up fried buns though) is the "vegetable bun" which is sour preserved veggie with mayo, chili and chopped peanuts on top stuffed in a baked bun cut lengthwise. and of course, corn and mayo...yeah! Chinese folks seem to love the mayo for some reason, but it all tastes good to me.

                1. re: m00ncakes

                  buns, mmm...!

                  my favorites tend to be the savory ones, rather than the sweet...for a few vegetarian options since the savory buns tend to involve meat: i love the "mushroom bun" at Yi-Mei Bakery on Roosevelt (right by the train entrance)...it is spicy dried radish, shitake mushrooms and probably some other stuff in a baked sweet bun...very savory and delicious. I haven's seen this version anywhere else, so if anyone else knows of a spot, let me know! Another pick from the same place, which is pretty oily (better than the straight up fried buns though) is the "vegetable bun" which is sour preserved veggie with mayo, chili and chopped peanuts on top stuffed in a baked bun cut lengthwise. and of course, corn and mayo...yeah! Chinese folks seem to love the mayo for some reason, but it all tastes good to me.

                  1. re: m00ncakes

                    more on simplicity. If you go to the place in the basement of the 99 cent store on the corner in front of the entrance to the flushing library you'll get awesomde bun and soup. but if you go to the place in the 99 cent store upstairs in the mall you'll get slop

                  2. re: Billy

                    Hmm, buns...
                    I used to always get the pan-fried vegetable pork buns at Zhu Ji because the steamed ones were never ready in the morning when I stopped by. I'm sure the steamed version is just as good, but in my opinion, anything pan-fried is just more savory. Not a fan of roast pork buns, but I always had to have the mini ones at KB Garden. I recently started liking flaky pastries after trying the radish soubings at Yang Tze River although having too much can cause a grease overload.

                    Oh, and if you like dumplings, the ones at Mayflower (food court/bakery on Main Street next to the LIRR station) are also pretty finger-licking good.

                    And just as a disclaimer, my taste in food tends to be pretty simple. I've never really appreciated a great shark fin soup or braised sea cucumber. So...just keep that in mind if you order any of my "recommended" dishes.

                    Enjoy!

                  3. re: m00ncakes

                    Wow, m00ncakes, what a great detailed list. I wish I had this to reference when I was in Flushing this weekend. Since I don't get to Flushing as often as I'd like, I'm still a bit intimidated by the sheer variety of the Asian cuisines there. Your list will surely help my food decisions there. Thanks so much. Looking forward to more of your posts.

                  4. Funny you should ask. My girlfriend and I got into NYC yesterday from Columbus, Ohio jonesing for chow and took the Q48 from Laguardia to Flushing. Although I don't have the extensive Flushing knowledge that others here apparently do, I can heartily recommend the dim sum house we went to, East Lake, at the corner of Main and Franklin. Every dish we got was piping hot and delicious (even at 2 pm! but it was a Monday, after all): the slippery noodles, the shumai, the shrimp dumplings. Their hot sauce, in addition, was an interesting blend of traditional chili sauce and hot mustard.

                    1. I won't claim it as "hands down the best," because I don't know every restaurant in Flushing, but I can say that of all the Chinese restaurants I know in Queens or Manhattan, I like Spicy & Tasty the best!

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: Pan

                        For Sichuanese definitely the best I've had... though Xiao La Jiao around the corner is a worthy contender.

                      2. the best Taiwanese restaurant in flushing is no doubt Gu xiang on 39th Ave(i am not sure if it has English name...) right next to the church/cemetery. That place is consistenly good - my parents and I have been going on for years. Plus they have a separate vegetarian menu cooked in a separate kitchen too. They are also one of the few places that really know how to sautee that stinky tofu, haven't found a better version of that in New York than theirs.
                        The place is packed on weekends though - all the Taiwanese seem to know the place already.

                        4 Replies
                        1. re: zorgclyde

                          a.k.a. "Gu-Shine"? http://www.yelp.com/biz/LIo7CUUgZBZw8...

                          Appreciate the tip. What else do you like there?

                          1. re: squid kun

                            Yeah that's the place.
                            Their Taiwanese family menu is a good deal - the soup is actually a real soup, not just broth. I am not familiar with the meat menu, but my dad always orders the fish (in brown sauce? anyways hong shao style in chinese) and beef in satay sauce with spinach. Their fa cai soup on the veggie menu is good too - you can mix and match. Also you can ask for their pickles, which they give automatically to the regulars, and I really like it with heavier dishes. The mixed veggies buddhist style is pretty good too. Basically just go and try out their family meals. But do order the stir-fry stinky tofu.

                            1. re: zorgclyde

                              I detoured to see it tonight after eating at Xiao La Jiao, the great new Sichuanese place. There is indeed a big sign in English that says "Gu Shine"! The place was packed and people were waiting for tables... on a Tuesday! It's just west of Roosevelt at 135-40 39 Av.

                              1. re: Brian S

                                Actually another really great Taiwanese place to try is Red Chopsticks (136-17 41st Avenue)- the food is consistently fresh and piping hot - we especially like the pan fried flounder that is part of the family menu, as well as the oyster omelette thing. The fact that the surroundings are not red/pink and gold or covered in years of grease is just a nice little bonus.