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Havn't Tried Potstickers at U-Lee? Go Right Now!!!!

  • r

As a dumpling fanatic, it is unforgivable that it took me about two months to go to U-Lee, from the day it was recommended.

If i had known what i was missing, everyone of those 60 days would have been painful.

I will never again order a hamburger, becuase at U-Lee each of the six potstickers contains one huge hamburger size lump of flavorful ground meat mixed with a heady dose of ginger and garlic. The juices of the moist meat are perfectly contained by the slightly crisp, browned dumpling skin that incases each dumpling.

Moral: Do not make the same mistake as me; run, dont walk to U-Lee at Hyde, and Jackson in Knob Hill.

Problems you will face:

1) They make you order an entree with your potstickers. (Do not make the mistake of trying to trick them at their own game by ordering a soup as your entree. The Hot&Sour soup was neither hot nor sour.)
2) You must make your own tabletop dipping sauce (Damn those soy sauce and vineger bottles!)
3) They will not steam them (even if you politely beg)

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  1. Arent they great??

    With their size they can sometimes be a little gamy, but I love 'em.

    1. m
      Melanie Wong

      Here's a picture of the potstickers at U-Lee courtesy of a neighborhood chowhound.

      Link: http://www.chowhound.com/topics/show/...

      11 Replies
      1. re: Melanie Wong

        See the link for a close-up shot of their potstickers, along with some opinions from my *other* favorite chow site.

        Link: http://www.fudcourt.com/ulee.html

        1. re: Richard
          m
          Melanie Wong

          Hey, thanks for the link, Mr. Bluetooth. I'd forgotten about those guys for a while.

          Potsticker styles are certainly controversial. I'd say that U-Lee captures the American dream and bigger is better ethos. On the other hand, those from the Far East would be in search of something else.

          Link: http://chowhound.com/chowmarket/index...

          1. re: Melanie Wong
            m
            Mr. Bluetooth

            Oops, forgot to change my identity .

            Those from the Far East would certainly consider it an anomaly. I'd venture that the amount of meat in one of these things would not invoke a general sense of pleasure, taste notwithstanding.

            BTW, potstickers really aren't hard to make once you get the hang of it. And once you do, there's usually no point in specifically going out for them. Alongside a mixture of soy sauce, vinegar and sesame oil, they make a great dinner (I have been known to consume around 30 of them in one sitting).

            1. re: Mr. Bluetooth
              m
              Melanie Wong

              30?!? I wonder how many of U-Lee's you could eat. (g)

              Care to share your potsticker recipe? Here's a link to mine. Northerners would wince at adding cabbage to the mix, but I think it lightens up the mixture. One could use all chopped leeks instead.

              Link: http://www.chowhound.com/topics/show/...

              1. re: Melanie Wong
                m
                Mr. Bluetooth

                Well Melanie,

                I must admit - it's my wife's recipe; I just wrap the fillings (g). There's no link to the recipe, and she doesn't make exact measurements (plays it by ear), but it's similar to your recipe, which is a good sign. So, I'll type one up at your request:

                1 package sui gow wrappers
                1-1.5 lb. lean ground pork
                1 head cabbage, shredded (or leek, but it's not for everyone)
                1 T sesame oil
                1 tsp sugar
                salt, pepper, soy sauce to taste
                minced fresh ginger

                Combine all ingredients in a large bowl.
                Prepare a small bowl of water.
                Use spoon to spread filling onto wrapper, then dip finger into water to moisten approximately half the circumference of wrapper and seal. The edges can be crimped if desired.

                These dumplings can be pan fried as described in your recipe, or simply boiled in a large pot of water until done.

                Since each dumpling contains the key elements of meat, vegetables and flour, they make great self-contained meals. Eat one at a time until you're satisfied!

                1. re: Mr. Bluetooth

                  So you eat half a batch and the wife and kids get the rest? (g)

                  Thanks for sharing.

                  Link: http://chowhound.com/chowmarket/index...

                2. re: Melanie Wong

                  I'm one of the non-cabbage people. I usually use about half and half of gow choy (chinese leek) and napa cabbage. I salt the shredded cabbage to draw out the moisture before adding it to the filling, or it gets too watery. Depending on my mood and what I have on hand, I might also add chopped prawns, dried shrimps or dried shitakes too. I also use pork that's not too lean, that helps to lighten the filling (I know, that doesn't sound logical, but the fat makes the filling less dry and dense).
                  I make my own wrappers with a simple dough of flour, water and salt. It is a fair amount of work to roll out your own wrappers, but if you have a friend or two to help you, it goes quickly, and the resulting eating pleasure is worth the effort.

                  1. re: chibi

                    Yes, I like the convenience and the thinness of ready-made sui gow wrappers, but they don't have the chewy texture that a homemade dough would offer. Now, do you fold the potstickers in closed half-moons or leave an openings on each end?

                    1. re: Melanie Wong
                      m
                      Mr. Bluetooth

                      Well, I'll volunteer that I've gone the homemade route as well, and they're sealed half-moons. It would especially make sense if you're boiling the dumplings, whence the wrapper may loosen and/or filling may seep out if not sealed tightly.

                      1. re: Mr. Bluetooth

                        Certainly that only makes sense for the pan-fried style of dumplings. I asked because a previous request here was looking for the open-ended style, which I've only had once before in NY.

                      2. re: Melanie Wong

                        I close them up. But there is a recipe in my Northern-style pastry and noodle cookbook that shows how to make open-ended ones.

          2. I think I am among one of U-Lee's most faithful followers... I have tried chinese food all over the bay area and nothing satisfies me quite as much as U-Lee... when I was a kid I lived just down the street from u-lee and I would get it all the time... now I drive all the way to sf from my home in redwood city just for U-Lee... if you are going to go there you MUST try the BBQ pork wonton soup... IT IS THE BEST I HAVE EVER HAD... another must is the lemon beef (a dish that I have yet to see on another chinese menu)... another favorite in the BBQ pork chow fun.... U-Lee is definitely a destination for any true chowhound!