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Lu Ming Zhun?

  • j
  • jonathan sibley Apr 5, 2000 10:53 PM
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Someone from China told me that he had great Dim Sum at a restaurant in Chinatown called "Lu Ming Zhun" in Chinese. Any idea what restaurant this might be?

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  1. "Someone from China told me that he had great Dim Sum at a restaurant in Chinatown called "Lu Ming Zhun" in Chinese. Any idea what restaurant this might be?"

    Maybe (a spin-off of some guy's dad's place) Lou Ming's Son?

    1. My Chinese is pretty weak, but I remember having this conversation with my dad a while ago, and I THINK Lu Ming Zhun is actually the Chinese name for Joe's Shanghai. It's not a translation by any means - my dad said something about "deer", which is "lu", and "spring", which is "chun", not "zhun". Although I didn't think they had dim sum, and the last meal I had there wasn't one *anyone* would rave about,so I might just be completely off.
      I like Jim's "Lou Ming's Son" theory better...

      1 Reply
      1. re: Daveena
        j
        jonathan sibley

        you might be right (on the name, and on not being impressed). I think he mentioned some soup dumplings that would make sense, and I, too, wasn't overly impressed overall when I went (knowing it only as Joe's Shanghai). Not sure about Dim Sum, but maybe he puts the soup dumplings into that category....

      2. yep, Lu Ming Tsuen is Joe's Shanghai.
        never been there for Dim Sum.
        they're famous for their soup dumplings, which are pretty good, but not the best that i've had.
        beware that Joe's Shanghai has become quite commercialized and is almost always very crowded. (expect to wait a while, and share a table with others)
        i've heard their branch in Flushing is much better.

        1 Reply
        1. re: ang

          Agree. Joe's Shanghai in Manhattan's Chinatown rubs me the wrong way. Though I find that the food tastes a whole lot better when you speak in their dialect and order what they call "the right food" (i.e. in Chinese, it's called something like knowing what goes with what, what appropriate dishes ought to be at the table at given time, date, season, and matches so-and-so dish). When I went with a very skilled friend, the waiter was courteous, went out of the way to server us first (which irked the other customers), and the food was superb.

          Returned later with other friends, minus the skill, and it was commercialized, run-of-the-mill, harried food that is highly overcharged.