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Hing Lung Restaurant in China Town

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I walked by this place last weekend, and upon some searching found a few mention of this place in previous threads.
I saw fresh yuan tau (probably bad spelling, but fried Chinese donuts), lots of yummy looking jook.
I plan on going back this weekend. Anything I should not miss while I'm there?

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  1. They're known for their rice porridge, but lately I've been going to Washington Street Bakery for that. I think theirs is better -- anyone care to comment?

    1 Reply
    1. re: diligent

      My first choice is Washington St. Bakery for jook too. I do like Hing Lung and probably eat there more often, but my pattern seems to be to go there late since they have long hours. The yau tiao at Hing Lung is my favorite for just buying one and snacking on it. A little heavier and bigger, but I like the density and chewiness of it. doesn't reheat as well as others.

    2. The fried bread is the best I have had in San Francisco. The Jook is okay, but there are better. What is great there is a dish with the fried bread wrap around with whole sheets of steam rice noodles. You have to have fresh there. After it cools it not good. They do that dish the best in San Francisco.

      4 Replies
      1. re: Lambert Yim

        "fried bread wrapped with steamed rice noodle"

        That's sounds very interesting. Do you know what it's called? How should I ask for it? I have not heard of a dish like that before in Chinese breakfast cuisine.

        1. re: Wendy Lai

          Don't know what it's called, but I've had it in Taipei.

          1. re: Wendy Lai

            Don't know its name either but I've seen it in dim sum restaurants. Just like the shrimp, charsiu, or beef rice noodle wraps topped with sweet soy sauce. But it has youtiao wrapped in the rice noodle sheets.

            1. re: Wendy Lai

              Hi there,

              The dish you are asking about is called Zha Liang in mandarin, Zha leung in catonese. I think the characters are zha as in "deep-fried" and liang as in "two" (when counting objects).

              Hing Lung does a quite decent version, although the yau tiu is a bit too doughy for my taste, and the sauce is a bit too sweet. Having said that, I don't know I've ever had a better version in San Francisco.