HOME > Chowhound > Pennsylvania >

Discussion

*Lebanon* bologna?? also dried beef

  • j

Enjoying memories of my trip through PA last week, I checked out the sclydeweaver.com website to see what they sell over the web. I notice that one of their offerings is Lebanon bologna. Who knew? I had always thought, like, Palestinian bologna but the more I think of it the less that makes sense. Anyway I am thinking of getting some of the genuine article by mail now that I am back in Texas and I wonder if anyone has tips or recipes for serving it. Also, any guidance on the sliced dried beef? What cut is it anyway? Dried how? What are some typical ways it is served?

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. Sandwiches are the most typical way for serving both. However, a little creativity can go a long way. One of the ways me and my grandfather used to do for lebanon bologna is take some cream cheese, spread it on the bologna slice, then roll it up to eat.

    3 Replies
    1. re: Gary

      Lebanon bologna is good with cream cheese spread on it with a small gherkin pickle and rolled up.
      My sister in law makes a dip with dried beef, cream cheese, a bit of sour cream and chopped scallion and lemon juice. Really tasty.

      1. re: freeone

        YEAH!! A gherkin! Dip! Thank you, I knew about bologna sandwiches and creamed beef on toast but the little tricks are exactly what I was hoping for.

      2. re: Gary

        do you know i always thought my mother had invented the LB/cream cheese roll up?!?! god that was always ne of my favorites! i grew up in lancaster so i ate the stuff like crazy, then moved to new york and for 23 years coudn't get my hands on it (nyc has just about everything, but no lebanon!) now i'm in miami and happy as hell: for some weird reason all the stores here carry it!

      3. Lebanon bologna gets its name from the Lebanon Valley of PA. It's generally served just like any other cold cuts, sliced and put out with cheese, or whatever.

        I don't know what cut of beef is typically used, but it is usually air-dried. (Anyone: Don't they just dry whole sides of beef for this?) Typical preparation is creamed chipped beef on toast, usually for breakfast.

        1. The Joy of Cooking has a great creamed chipped beef recipe for your dried beef. I don't know what else to do with the stuff.

          1. Another poster has already noted that it is called "Lebanon" from Lebanon, PA, not the middle east--this is one of my childhood favorites, sliced thin in a sandwich on soft white bread with American cheese and yellow mustard (I SAID it was a childhood fave!). I still get a craving for it every now and then, and in my area of PA, I have a choice from various styles of Lebanon, including sweet Lebanon (an acquired taste). It is also commonly called summer sausage and can be served as a kind of variation on pepperoni, cut in cubes and served with cheese as a snack. There are a few ways to serve dried beef, but as others also noted, it's mostly prepared as creamed dried beef or used in sandwiches. My mother's recipe was: 4 oz. dried beef, shredded with your fingers, browned in 4 oz. melted butter. Sprinkle with 4 Tbsp. flour and stir until well combined and the flour and butter make a little roux-like substance, then slowly stir in 2-1/2 cups milk, and cook until thick. Serve over toast for breakfast, or baked or boiled potatoes as a quick supper, or even better, over home-fried potatoes. Any wonder I need to watch my weight so closely? Us PA Germans believe in fat and starch!

            4 Replies
            1. re: Diane

              THAT'S WHAT I'M TALKING ABOUT!!! It would never have occurred to me to serve it over potatoes. I love it. Now, what's good on a dried beef sandwich?

              1. re: Diane

                I'm not sure I understand, because Lebanon bologna and summer sausage are certainly NOT the same thing. In fact, I was born/raised/live in the area and I've never heard the 2 terms interchanged until now.

                Whatever the case, I do like your dried beef idea. Many people skip the step of browning it, and just make a cream white gravy without as much flavor.

                Lebanon Bologna is great pan fried like you would a ham steak in a skillet. Eat it with breakfast. Or add a tomato slice, and melt some muenster on top of that. Put in on a nice crusty kaiser roll and you've got yourself a nice lunch.

                1. re: Ace Mclean

                  A +1 on pan fried Lebanon Bologna. I like it in a sandwich with mustard or nothing. I find there is more flavor when lightly fried.

                  1. re: Bacchus101

                    Very right, Bacchus. GFweb1 has a brilliant idea below.

              2. Cool to see another foodie that's discovered the joy of S. Clyde Weaver's . My advice , if you like Lebanon bologna , try the " summer snack " beef sticks . Get about a pound of them & see what you think . I live a few miles from 2 of their stores , & can't go in without getting some . They also have some mean gift baskets , if that's your thing .