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Whole Roast Foie Gras

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Pia Dec 1, 2001 01:06 AM

Having recently read Limster's posts on the International Board regarding his trip to France (guaranteed to get those salivary glands working overtime) , my own fond memories of foie gras have started to take on the dimensions of a distinct yearning, one which may soon border on obsession.

For me, it was a whole roast foie gras in port wine and caper sauce, reverently devoured (all 600 grams=18oz) by 3 of us at the Pont de l'Ouysse in Lacave, France. To describe it in detail would be form of masochism I'm not strong enough to endure, especially since I don't know when I can go back.

Is there somewhere in the Bay Area that can do a good whole roast foie gras? (It's not as simple as it sounds, as the foie has to be absolutely fresh, of impeccable quality, and cooked just so--otherwise you end up with a piece of leather floating in duck butter

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    BruceWC RE: Pia Dec 1, 2001 01:26 AM

    I always order my foie-gras from French Selections (link below). It is impeccable - from Sonoma. You can also get good foie gras at Bryans in Laurel Village.

    Link: http://www.frenchselections.com/

    4 Replies
    1. re: BruceWC
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      Sashi RE: BruceWC Dec 3, 2001 10:23 PM

      Forgive my ignorance, but you seem to know your stuff here - what exactly is foie gras? Is it the liver?

      1. re: Sashi
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        Pia RE: Sashi Dec 4, 2001 12:55 AM

        Foie gras is the enlarged liver of a specially fattened
        duck or goose. It is several times the size of an ordinary liver, and its fat content is obscene. But, properly prepared, it is a sublime treat--one that makes otherwise responsible adults happily pay through the nose for the chance at an angioplasty.

        I know people who normally refuse to eat liver but who will happily down more than their share of foie gras. If you want to give it a shot, without spending too much on something unfamiliar, try buying a slice of fresh (refrigerated) duck liver terrine at a good supermarket or deli, e.g., Draeger's. Try to get something that says "foie gras entier" or "bloc de foie gras" which are nearly pure duck liver.

        Don't bother with pate de foie, which is usually more pork and assorted fats than foie gras. The quality of the tinned foie gras available here is, at best, tolerable, and will not provide you with a sensory revelation of the magnitude merited by its price.

        All that said, I hope I'm welcoming you to the quest for great foie gras!

      2. re: BruceWC
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        Pia RE: BruceWC Dec 4, 2001 12:59 AM

        Many thanks for the hot tip! It'll go straight to my bookmarks. Have you tried cooking foie gras yourself? If so, do you have any suggestions as to how to prepare it?

        1. re: Pia
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          becky RE: Pia Dec 7, 2001 10:29 AM

          When it comes to preparing foie gras, sauteeing is probably the way to go if you've never worked with it before. Terrines are a whole different animal, and I'd suggest stearing clear unless you have a guide, since they involved deveining the beast and careful, slow cooking. The only problem with buying whole fresh foie is that you probably have to buy a whole liver. Which is a hell of a lot. But maybe you can split it with people. I've never roasted whole FG but that would be another option. Anyway, as for sauteeing here are some tips:

          Slice a piece of even thickness (about 1 inch). Heat a small saute pan until almost smoking. If your pan is not hot enough the fat will just melt. Season liver with salt and pepper on both sides. Add it to the pan, BUT DO NOT ADD ANY ADDITIONAL FAT. There is plenty already there. When it is nicely browned, turn it over. When you touch it it should no longer have the hard butter-like consistency that it does when it is raw. Do not over cook it. It is a good idea to pat it with paper towels. If you see a piece of the vein, you can easily remove it with a toothpick. Doing so before you cook it though will probably cause the liver to fall apart.

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        Jupiter RE: Pia Dec 1, 2001 01:01 PM

        I have never been to Aqua, but my friend went two weeks ago and got a copy of the menu and they have it listed as an entree on their dinner menu.

        "Whole roasted foie gras with carmelized onions and granny smiths" or something like that, but i remember thinking, "WOW, i wonder what the hell that tastes like, and how full you must be after you eat it!"

        of course, they do not list a price for it. Ask around and see it anyone has done it! Good luck.

        4 Replies
        1. re: Jupiter
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          Christina RE: Jupiter Dec 2, 2001 07:42 PM

          I have had Aqua's foie gras as an appetizer and it's wonderful so I assume the entree would be equally wonderful.

          1. re: Jupiter
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            Christina RE: Jupiter Dec 2, 2001 07:55 PM

            I have had Aqua's foie gras as an appetizer and it's wonderful so I assume the entree would be equally wonderful.

            1. re: Jupiter
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              Melanie Wong RE: Jupiter Dec 2, 2001 08:24 PM

              Here's a comment on the Las Vegas version.

              Link: http://www.chowhound.com/topics/show/...

              1. re: Jupiter
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                Eugene RE: Jupiter Dec 4, 2001 01:12 PM

                I was at Aqua earlier this year and a friend of mine (who loves foie gras) ordered the entree. It was a HUGE portion, sliced up into 5-6 pieces - my friend only finished half of it, and the rest of it was barely finished by the other 5 of us at the table... and it was fanatastic, melt-in-your mouth...

                If I recall correctly it cost $75 or $80. For foie gras lovers I think 2 people can make a meal out of one entree and two appetizers.

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