HOME > Chowhound > Greater Boston Area >

Discussion

Addis Red Sea.....

  • m

Hi--has anyone eaten at Addis Red Sea? Is this indeed the best Ethiopian in boston as all the usual suspects claim (citysearch,boston magazine etc)? Any recommendations on a good place to go for a drink nearby after dinner? Thank you for any feedback!

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. boy are you in luck!

    a contingent of Boston's Finest was dispatched there recently.

    (see link)

    Link: http://www.chowhound.com/topics/show/...

    1. Hi,

      We actually did a Chowhound Dinner there back in February (link below). Right across the street is Aquitaine (French Bistro). It has a nice selection of wine by the glass - although a very small bar. That's a great neighborhood to have a cocktail, though, and I'm sure others will chime in.....

      Link: http://www.chowhound.com/topics/show/...

      1. Can't say it is the "best" as I have not eaten at another, but I believe it is the oldest Ethiopian restaurant in Boston.
        It is a fun experience, and very different from any other cuisine I have had. The flavors are unique, and everything, from the tables to the way you eat, is so different from our cultural norms. If you have never been, I strongly recommend paying a visit.

        1. Yes, Addis Red Sea is good (and was appreciated by the chowhounds as others have noted). Now that the simply named Ethiopian Restaurant in Central Square is no more (no, not the Asmara, which I've never warmed up to, this one was over by the busses and got destroyed during the renewal a few years back), it probably is the best Ethiopian in Boston (though some day I'll try the one in JP).

          BTW, if you want to make the Addis experience even better, make sure to ask for teff injera instead of/in addition to the regular kind. Also, if you like raw meat but don't like the taste of the butter in the kitfo, ask for gored gored raw. On the veggie side, the shuro wat is still my favorite.

          T.B.

          6 Replies
          1. re: T.B.
            c
            ChesterPrynne

            It sounds like Addis may be the poster is looking for -- especially since the immediate neighborhood has lots of bars and other attractions and the food is tasty.

            Fasika in JP is definitely worth checking out. I enjoyed the injera which was tangier and I believe darker than the regular injera at Addis -- perhaps it was teff injera! What is the difference between teff injera and the reg. injera? I also rather enjoyed the vegetarian entrees (perhaps even a bit more than Addis's) such as the house vegetarian special and the cabbage.

            1. re: ChesterPrynne

              Teff injera is injera made with teff, the traditional grain grown in Ethiopia. It's darker and and has a stronger taste; sounds like that's what they default to at Fasika. "Regular" injera is made with some other grain, probably just wheat flour. It's been the default at most of the Ethiopian restaurants I've been to, and I only recently learned to ask for teff injera at Addis.

              1. re: T.B.
                c
                ChesterPrynne

                Thanks for the info, T.B.! I will definitely ask for the teff injera the next time I go to Addis.

                1. re: T.B.

                  I didn't know what the difference was, well, besides discovering what teff, the world's smallest grain was,(g) but they did serve two different kinds of injera to us at Addis Red Sea, an off-white one, and what I thought were whole wheat ones, but were probably the teff...We didn't know enough to ask, but they seemed to come with the assortment we got.

                  1. re: T.B.

                    I'm not sure exactly what's available in the US, but in Ethiopia there are several colors of injera, made from different varieties of t'eff.

                    Tanginess might be a function of the length of time the batter ferments.

                    It's my understanding that in the US much of the injera is made from a mix of t'eff and wheat. I'm still confused about why they don't just make it from t'eff; perhaps cost is a factor.

                2. re: T.B.

                  anyone tried sagla on washinton st. in JP?

                3. Thanks to all who responded! We had a wonderful dinner--tried the last two combos on the menu and of course, the kiftko. We had both kinds of injera as well.