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Mirliton recipes

f
Frolic Oct 14, 2004 09:26 PM

Any ideas on what to do with mirlitons? They look so intriguing.

I have a Prudhomme recipe that cooks them pirogue style stuffed with shrimp, andouille, and tasso topped with oyster hallandaise. No doubt that would be good. Hell, a shoe box stuffed with those ingredients and covered in oyster hollandaise would be good.

How about some less elaborate suggestions?

Link: http://www.frolicofmyown.com

  1. c
    charles Oct 14, 2004 09:42 PM

    Those things arn't ate up with big flavor, so the shoebox probably is better.
    I typed "mirliton recipe" and did a AOL search, and lotsa things popped up.

    2 Replies
    1. re: charles
      a
      Amanda Oct 14, 2004 10:41 PM

      I like an old fashioned Mirliton recipe, at least Mama Gina tells me it's old fashioned, called Sweet and Spicy Mirliton. I've had it several times, first at the Esplanade Avenue home of the Mother of a college friend, and I've made it a few times. Unfortunately, he recipe is packed away in a box that I've not yet gotten around to unpacking (I keep getting distracted by this man who also lives here).

      Basically, this dish consists of strips of Mirliton, covered by a glaze composed of a mixture of a number of spices such as cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg with a little brown sugar added and baked in the oven. You drizzle a little butter over the coated pieces in a pan with 1" or so sides and bake in the oven and when done, you place the pieces on a platter and sprinkle with (I think) veiling sugar.

      From somewhere I've heard of a dish that is essentially a custard made with Mirliton.

      1. re: Amanda
        c
        CherBebe Oct 14, 2004 11:19 PM

        I used to make a shrimp mirliton dish that went something like this:

        Sautee chopped onion, bell pepper, and garlic in butter (or EVOO). Add cubed mirliton, seasoned with a very generous amount of Tony Chachere's. Cook it down a bit before adding peeled and deveined shrimp, cooking til shrimp are pink. Spoon it into a baking dish, mixing in grated sharp cheddar and topping with bread crumbs & grated parmesan. Dot with butter and bake at 350 til golden and yummy.

        It's sort of old-fashioned and I don't make it very often anymore. (Notice that I didn't put in amounts? Sorry, you've just got to do it by feel.)

    2. l
      local boy Oct 14, 2004 10:55 PM

      Stuffed mirliton is the only way I've ever had it prepared. Boil them, carve out the inside, and mix it in a stuffing with seasoning, shrimp, sausage, breadcrumbs, etc., then fill and bake. Sounds like your Prudhomme recipe, only I've never done it with hollandaise. The skin is papery and flavorless, as I recall, so the "shell" usually remains uneaten, but after a good boiling, the flesh is soft, mild, and slightly buttery like a squash or something. It's not something to eat by itself, though.

      1. The Chowhound Team Oct 15, 2004 02:46 AM

        Folks-

        Please move the recipe discussion to the General Topics board, let's please keep this board focussed on where to find the good stuff in the New Orleans area, but not how to prepare it.

        Thanks.

        Link: http://chowhound.com/boards/general/g...

        2 Replies
        1. re: The Chowhound Team
          f
          Frolic Oct 15, 2004 09:36 AM

          Sorry about that. I'd never seen a Mirliton outside of New Orleans, so I assumed it was a regional item. I'll repost in general topics.

          Link: http://www.frolicofmyown.com

          1. re: Frolic
            s
            sheilah Mar 15, 2010 08:52 AM

            Mirliton is called chayote in the rest of the world.

        2. t
          Tom Oct 15, 2004 09:46 AM

          The best appraoch to mirliton is to call the Red Maple on the west bank, ask if their seafood stuffed mirliton is the daily special, and head there for lunch. I ate there for the first time this week, ordered the mirliton, and can't wait to return.

          1 Reply
          1. re: Tom
            f
            Frolic Oct 15, 2004 09:58 AM

            Thanks. I'll give it a try. Sometimes it's good to see an unfamiliar ingredient prepared right before you try it at home.

            Since the moderators want recipe requests moved to "General Topics," I'll repost a question to see if anyone else has encountered mirlitons on New Orleans menus.

            Link: http://www.frolicofmyown.com

          2. c
            chefee Oct 15, 2004 05:11 PM

            Mirliton and rice dressing is a wonderful dish that I make every year at Thanksgiving and Christmas. I would be glad to share it with you--just send an email if you're interested. Also don't forget that mirlitons are called chayote in Mexican/Central American cuisine, so there should be lots of recipes online. I've also experienced an vegetarian Indian curry with mirlitons.

            1 Reply
            1. re: chefee
              f
              Frolic Oct 15, 2004 06:17 PM

              I moved this question over to the "General Topic" board at the request of the moderator.

              Someone over there said that she had only seen them called Mirlitons in New Orleans. Everyone else calls them chayote squash.

              Link: http://www.frolicofmyown.com

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